• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest Anonymous Poster

what language for writing games? c or delphi?

12 posts in this topic

Although I don't want to discourage you from using Delphi, you should know that most first-person games, and most games in general, are written in C/C++. Most of the books and articles about game programming are written with that in mind. There ARE Delphi resources out there, and we will have some up eventually, but you will probably have an easier time if you learn C/C++.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
C/C++ 'fraid IMHO. Is more fiddly but thats the price for 1 level above assembler (as in most compilers will generate the assembler code from C and you can tweak to your hearts content - not to different from C). It can run quicker and seems to be more portable - hey, I have coded C on UNIX, Windows (flavours) and an IBM ES9000 mainframe - gives you a bit of scope. Also means the DirectX interfaces (assuming you are coding under Windows) is not too scary (as is not the API) and LINUX should be a doddle (relativly speaking, have only coded under UNIX so shoot me).
Also if well written and COMMENTED can be reused - C++ is honestly very good at reusable code (write it once, write a document on the public calls available and forget it. Or at least just tweak it)
Have not yet tried Visual C++. Anyone recommend it? And come to that what is it really? Does it produce tight code or just quick to code?
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
get DJGPP and ALLEGRO at once
DJGPP is a 32 bit protected mode compiler for dos and ALLEGRO is a verry good graphics library with a lot of 2D and 3D functions
and a lot of 3d rendering systems
get it now !!!!
type "ALLEGRO DJGPP" in yahoo to find them

------------------
Programming is an art

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Delphi is adequate to the task of creating a 3D FPS. Delphi's performance does not lag behind that of C++ in significant ways. There are several DirectX and OpenGL packages available (including 3D engines) that support or were written in Delphi.

I use Delphi exclusively for my development on Windows 95/98/NT.

My advice is to use whatever you want to use, feel most comfortable using, and can be most productive with.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Delphi is a very good platform for designing games, it's just that there are few resources to help you along. I've been using Delphi for several years, and have recently written a game called Marble Crazy using Delphi and DirectX 6 which has been quite popular.

The performance of the final code is excellent, the code doesn't have compatibility problems, and a good Visual Pascal compiler for Linux is just around the corner.

Having a language which isn't just 'Assembler with go faster stripes' helps with debugging too.

Maybe we need some articles in Delphi to help beginners along.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You might check out the page: turbo

It's a page dedicated to creating games with Borland/Inprise products such as Delphi and C++Builder. It's hosted by
no2games

------------------
DavidRM
Samu Games

[This message has been edited by DavidRM (edited September 23, 1999).]

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
What does everyone think of conitec's 3D Game Studio version 4.0 "ACKNEX" with it's C-like scripting language? See: http://www.conitec.com/a4info.htm

I program in C and Java, and other things I won't mention. I'm thinking of purchasing the $200 version of the above mentioned product because I'm more interested in just making games than in writing code anymore. Is there really something that will let me "cheat" - let the VR visions in my head appear on the screen without all the heartache?

Or is it better to buy a 3D engine for C/C++? And which one do you guys prefer?


0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi !!

AnotherBigYapper : Why buying a 3D Engine if you just want to make games. If it's FPS, then buy Unreal (the editor is included) and then you can make games. Create new charakters, new Weapons, new textures and new sounds, and through altogether to create a "new" game with, buy the way, excellent graphics. If you want to code, do so, with Unreal's Scripting language.

Phillip

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Or you could try the genesis engine. The only risk to your not liking it is that you wasted sometime to download. Worst thing I found about it was that it's really scattered and a bit difficult to learn. Other than that it's cool. There's a demo for it which is amazing.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why buy a 3D engine - mainly because you can't sell anything you make with Unreal unless you've licensed the engine. I don't have 500K - 1M laying around do you? If you want to make a mod just for fun, fine, use Unreal.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i was wondering which language i would be better off writing a first person shooter game in. i know a fair amount in borland delphi 4 but i am not sure if i should learn c instead...
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thank you all for the replies. Yes, I agree that one wants a development system that is as near royalty-free as possible.

I'm not familiar with the genesis engine. Please describe it more, and provide a link.

Has anyone followed the above link to the A4 site, and what do you think of their product?
Here's another one I found advertised on this website: http://www.morfit.com/developers.html

What do you all think of the Morfit game development package?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites