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Fantasy Edge

comparing software.

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Well this was a post inspired by the posts saying IT is better than everything else blah blah blah. Im not going to repeat those. I actully want to know what IT is so cool for. I write MIDI useing a combo of midisoft and a yamaha softwavetable and i think that it sound fine. although I have also heard IT''s and they are pretty good but is there any particular benefit? Also, how the hell do you use that program? can i import midi''s and edit them?
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This is really just a battle between MODs and MIDI. I like to compose and playback with MIDI, because it is quicker to do. However, for games, I prefer the music to be in MOD format. Why? Not every one has descent sound cards, and MIDIs tend to sound... well, so "MIDI." (They remind me of Chip''s Challenge)MODs are a little more challenging in the sense that you must create your own samples, and one bad sample can ruin a tune.

As for converting MIDIs to MODs, I am sure there is a program somewhere... but the results will not be a 1:1 conversion. MODs are limited in tracks, so if your MIDIs use a lot of chords, expect to create a few samples of the instrument, including all the different chords they make (if any). I suspect that a MIDI->MOD converter would attempt to convert one MIDI track to one MOD track, ignoring chords.

All in all, do what ever floats your boat.
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thanks man that actully cleared a few things up. I actully write in midi, save as a song file and then make audio files to be converted to mp3. i noticed mp3 music in hero''s 3 and with my editing software, i can basically do whatever i want. but im not completely used to workingin wav so...

"Why does my life have to be so hard in every world?"

Nanami Jinii
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If you want to hear what "MODs" can sound like (with some serious work), please download the game I worked on a listen to it. It is called Dizzyball and you can download it off of this site in the "GD Showcase" over on the left side. Every song started as an XM in Fasttracker 2. I find trackers to be the best way to write music out of ANYTHING else that exists out there. As long as you have to means to be able to create samples then there is no other way to write music where you have as much control over everything (volume, panning, etc.) After I wrote everything in XM, I dumped individual tracks down to waves and mixed them and applied various effects in Cool Edit Pro.

Even if you cannot get the game to work, the music is all in MP3 format in the "music" folder. Please give it a listen. Within a few days, all of it is going to be up on MP3.COM.

www.dizzyball.com

-Chris
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