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Quests analysis

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Hey, I''m must be mad. Stayed up all night reading posts on the fourm, especially here in game design.

Too bad I only have one class later today...NOT!!!

Anyone down to code some concepts? I will tried to squeeze it in bettween school and my current project.

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I''m already looking around a bit to see if I can find an easy way to implement the basics of this ( i.e. a small 2D tile based framework for studying the emergent behaviours )


People might not remember what you said, or what you did, but they will always remember how you made them feel.
~ (V)^|) |<é!t|-| ~

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Actually, I think we are going a bit too far off tracks here.
THe initial reason I started this thread was to understand how we could change the classic :
go to L1 to trigger switch S1, then come back to talk to C1. If S1 is true, then you get the reward, otherwise you get a message that you have to finsih the quest.
What I''d like to see is a new way to create quests. By taking into accounts the characters involved. Just making them actually move when they say "I''ll meet you there", so that if they don''t meet you there, they must have had a problem, or you''ll simply camp until they arrive, or you can''t wait but you can''t afford going on without the support, so do you split your party ?
I think what it come down to is a better way to create quests (or whatever we might call them .. maybe game goals ?), because if you look at it, I think you could probably make a quest as deep as in most RPG with the current entity scripting that FPS games offer.
So the question is , how can we model a quest in a formal way ? What kind of parameters ? shoud we use scripts, should we leave room for emergence jsut like you all described ? How do we give the impression of freedom (that would imply emergence) without losing the ability to shape the story as we want (as designers/writers).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I think your answer is that folks have now designed away the traditional ''quest'' in favor of something with far more depth.

NPCs will have desires. One way to accomplish the goals is to have a hero do the task. The nice thing about the more in-depth NPCs is that it does away with frivolous tasks that it would be easier for the NPC to accomplish on their own.

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