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ahw

Writing for MMORPG

4 posts in this topic

Since I don''t have the actual experience of MMORPG (PAYING for playing an IRC meets Diablo games ???) I''d like to hear from people-who-know about the kind of plots that is developed in MMORPG. Is there a global quest everyybody tries to solve. Is the system mission based. Are the quests missions repetitive, do they "respawn" ("OMG ! The princess has been kidnapped ! AGAIN !") It would be very interesting to compare this with single player. Also, how plays BAldur''s gate in multiplayer, and Vampire ? Would they be more as an MMORPG, or as a single player story ?
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the graphical MMORPGs are basically hack & slash for the most part. The quests in everquest are repetitious, so they just thrive on player-to-player interaction while they kill stuff together. I think most text-based MUDs I've played have repetitious plots also. Although sometimes the moderators will make special quests as they control NPCs and such.

In Baulder's Gate, you have a party of up to 6 people. Each person can control more than 1 PC if there's less than 6 ppl. It's basically a single-player game but more than 1 person is controlling the PCs. The person who starts the game has a lot of control. Like person who starts the game can make it so only he/she can talk to NPCs, etc.

Edited by - Nazrix on September 10, 2000 7:03:55 PM
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I jsut read a review of Acheron''s call on gamespy.com, and I must say I thought that was very intresting. This is a good answer to the person who was asking of MMORPG should end.

As well, I''d like to revive this thread and ask you, on the knoweldge of the 36 situations I pointed to, and on the quest analysis and other thread I started, would/is it much different to make interesting plots for MMORPG.
Could we give more power to the players (even if it''s only to moderators) to create interesting events ?
And how would we create events without resorting to the simplistic systems (door, monster, treasure)?
Could we really make a decent plot for hundreds of persons to play a prat in ? Or do we make a nicely crafted 6 persons event, that tons of 6 persons party will go through ?
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Text-based freeform roleplaying.

Anything can happen. Everything does. People create plots, either deliberately, or inadvertantly, as a simple result of them roleplaying their character in a world full of other independently-controlled characters.

It''s pretty darn cool, but I''m entirely sure that it counts as a ''game''. More like real-time interactive fiction...

-Moth
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Well, the problem is, can you trust your players to play for the sake of the roleplay, and thus give them more freedom.

When you look/listen to all the stuff going on, I don''t know if it can be done yet. There is an incredible amount of morons out there that are jsut as bored online as they are in RealLife and think messing around is funny. On the other, they are a necessary evil, and after all, without the haunting image of a Player Killer, would the lives of virtual adventurers be exactly the same ?

My question was more, in arestricted environment such as an MMORPG, how the heck do you organise your quests/missions/whatever so that they provide entertainment without looking like stupid respawning events (the princess being kidnapped every full moon ?)

youpla :-P
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