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Guest Anonymous Poster

Visual Basic or C++???

10 posts in this topic

Do C++

learning visual basic once you know C++ will be a lot easier then the other way around.

But that's my opionon.

C++ is faster, more powerfull, yet more difficult then Vb.

Jaap

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Well I don't want you to go away thinking that Visual Basic is all bad, but if your in high school and you've got some time, your better off learning C or C++. Visual Basic is a simple enough language that it takes little or no time to figure out, and if your teaching your self it often leads to bad programming habbits. Good Luck
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If your ever going to make a real program yo going to learn VC++!
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correction: if you ever are going to make a real program, learn c++ and program for linux, don't mess with windows
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correction on the correction: : if you ever are going to get a job, learn c++ and program for windows, use linux to test the portability of your code

Seriously though, Linux is cool but I personally prefer Windows. It has a larger user base and a much better compiler available for it - oh not to mention the Office 2000 suite.

The truth be known - if you learn C++ you can write apps for both Windows and Linux.

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correction on the correction of the correction:

truth be known, more and more job openings are becoming availble for linux programmers, and since everyone is selling out and using windows, it will just be easier to get a job as a linux programmer. when it comes to the compiler issue, linux has a few compilers, for instence gcc & g++ which are more up to the standard then anything windows has, not to mention they are better optimized and your files will run faster on linux. AND, microsoft office isn't much to speak for, try using star office...

just a friendly comment from your friend zerovoid.

btw, if anyone is intrested in hacking or security related issues, perhaps you would be intrested in writing a tutorial or something for my groups page 'hackcentral.org'

also, if someone wanted to get their art displayed, we could use some flash interfaces, by the way, this isn't soliciting, because we don't pay

my email is zerovoid@hotmail.com

[This message has been edited by zerovoid (edited November 02, 1999).]

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Heh. OK I don't want to turn this into a Windows vs. Linux thread but have you actually used Office 2000? Star Office doesn't even come close. The debuggers for GCC and g++ don't offer as many features as VC++'s debugger. You may think they do but...

As I said. I like Linux. It is stable and emulates Windows nicely Unfortunately it is not used in our company (Unisys Corporation) and therefore not something I frequently program for. Windows 98 (and to a lesser extent NT 4.0) has interesting bugs (namely when working with DCOM) but it is a powerful gaming platform.

BTW How many games are written for Linux and/or MAC as compared to the PC? Ahem hehe.

OK Flame wars aside ...

My overall point to the original question is:

If you learn C++ you can easily (relatively) write code that compiles under Windows and Linux (and other operating systems too). Visual Basic is easy to learn but is very closely tied into the Windows way of doing things (heavy usage of COM: Component Object Model). Visual Basic hides a LOT of what goes on in a program, which is why I prefer C++. I like the control and the ability to port my code.

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ok, so if I learn Visual C++, will the documentation that comes with it be enough, or should I get a book or something?
Thanks!
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Jim, get a book called Tricks of the windows game programming gurus. That should help you out & comes with a trial version of visual C++ 6.0
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I am in High School, and trying to learn to program in either Visual Basic or Visual C++. Our High School has virtually no programing classes, so I will have to learn it on my own. I do know some Qbasic and am pretty good with HTML, but that is about the limit of my programing skills. Which should I learn, Visual Basic or Visual C++? Any and all help would be appreciated.

Thank you!

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