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Hellsp4wn

[web] Web page price

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I know this is a very vague question, but I was wondering how much I could expect to get for designing and scripting a web page for a company that mainly contains a time table management system, where the employees can check their working hours and the boss can post the tables. The designing process won't be a big part of the job... Does anyone have any idea?

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Depends on the creativeness of the design, and the complexity of the scripts.
For a amateur website you can ask $10-$100.
When the design gets funky, add $100-$200.
When the scripts get funky, add another $100-$200.
(For every other thing added, like Flash or JavaApplets, add another $100-$200.)
If you're business gets professional, you could add another $500.

But I guess, if you're coding an average 'clan-website'-style website, then you should start with $50-$200 as final price.

When you sell your website(-idea), always exaggerate. When you can get things done in 3 days, say a week. They'll think you did more work.

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I just charged 150 UKP for a whole site redesign. That was an introductary price though, it'd be more like 200-300.

As for scripting, generally 10-20 UKP per hour. The time management system is likely to be fairly simple, unless you want some advanced features such as automatic scheduling and such.

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A friend of mine said he charged upwards of 50 UKP per hour for design work, I thought that was a little steep. Some site I designed for a client, I put a good few hours into it. I worked out that if I charged 20 UKP per hour, I'd be earning upwards of 4000 UKP for the whole site.

As the OP said, designing isn't the major part. If I were speccing this, I'd write a list of MUST haves, COULD haves and WOW THAT'S COOL features and charge a sliding scale accordingly.

So a rock bottom price would get you the bare minimum and a longer time delay, but more will get you the best in a shorter time. I guess you get what you pay for.

As Pipo DeClown said, its up to you to charge him based on your skills and how quickly you can do it. Make sure what you quote them is accurate though, especially the timeframes.

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most web site design i've done has been at around $25-$50 an hour depending on what was involved. the idea follows just the price points in my area (SF or LA). Basically a similar full-time job pays around 40-60K per year. per week that's ~$775 - $1150 per 40 hour week which ends up at $20-$30 per hour. when i was doing contracting for a living, you figure that you're not always going to have work so you pad your rates a little to cover some of the inherrent risk of the profession. interestingly I found that people were more willing to hire me if my rates were a little higher because a lot of people seem to work on the "you get what you pay for" mentality. So they think that a cheap costing website will look cheap and a more expensive one will be better.

if you're thinking of this as a short term career, you'll just have to monkey with your rates as you get more contracts. just try and push them up as high as you can get them and still be getting constant work. setting the prices is a tough and not-fun game. you always run the risk of losing clients because you push the rates up to high and selling yourself short if you push them too low.

-me

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Thanks for the replies, it helped a lot.

Although I have experience with designing and scripting, I haven't been doing so for other people before, so I have no clue whatsoever on the prices. But we figured that for a site like the one described we would say $100-$200 as a base price, and maybe add some later according to requested features or the time it takes to finish.

Thx for your help =)

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Goodluck. Let us know how it goes.

Usually you should quote more time then you really expect it to take, by about 20% or even more if it's a bigger job.

This way, if you go over time (which is always possible, most things seem to take longer then you think they will), you won't be losing money, and second, if you do complete it in the actual time you expected, you come in well under what you quoted, and your client should be made quite happy.

Just remember, it's business. People expect to pay money.

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