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D programming language

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Well.. I'm just started with C++, and I heared about a new programming language: D. D will be a new language in the C family like they said on a website. My question is.. should I stop learning C++ and wait for D? I mean I'm affraid that I learned C++ for nothing, that nobody uses C++ anymore :( Or would D be the same as C++ with some small changes? That I can still learn C++ and than switch to D in a year or sometihng? Please tell me :)

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Firstly, D still has awhile to evolve before it even comes close to being as widely implemented as c++(if it ever gets to that stage). Second, the general rule is that if you learn one C based programming language, then it makes it easier to learn any other C based programming language. I would defiantly not stop learning c++ to wait for D.

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D is not a standard language. However, C++ is getting a little polish, as the standards organisations involved in it are planning to release a new standard with new programming features. Hopefully this will bring it up to speed with some of the features that Python and other newer languages have introduced to the programming world. I don't know the details of it though. Either way, I wouldn't bother with D.

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Quote:
Original post by Pxtl
However, C++ is getting a little polish, as the standards organisations involved in it are planning to release a new standard with new programming features. Hopefully this will bring it up to speed with some of the features that Python and other newer languages have introduced to the programming world.

I doubt that's going to happen. C++ carries around way too much legacy, and any attempt at a reform of the language would require cutting out much of that legacy, abandoning backwards compatibility. In certain circles, that would be considered heretical.

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Well, the purpose of the designs is to add new features and alternate approachs, not modify existing ones.

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Quote:

Either way, I wouldn't bother with D.

while you certainly shoulndt wait for D because it will make c++ obsolete, you might find it worth checking out though.

some weeks ago i have started programming in D. ive done a lot of programming and im already quite familiar with the language, and i must say im quite liking it. ive never used c++, but ive read a lot of tutorials, but i never really felt comfortable around it. a lot of concepts and syntax seem awkward to me.

D however adresses a lot of these issues. c++ has ofcource a much bigger codebase, but making c/c++ libs work in D isnt hard. im using SDL in D now and i have no complaints at all. it works, its fast, its simple. the compiler is still beta though, so some features might not be implemented, but so far i havnt had any problems with that either.

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D is excellent compared to C++. Try it, you will like it.

And it is linkable with C, so you lose very little using it.

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D seems to have great design as language itself.

But it's still in development so new features are constantly added
and obscured are removed. The compiler is developed mainly by one person (Walter Bright), but very expirienced one.

There are quite a few libraryies for D for now, but you can link C
libs with D programs, having changed headers a bit.

There is no debugger developed explisitly for D, but people say you can use some other debugger (e. g. from Visual Studio)

So, I advice you to use D in your hobby programming, it's quite funny and you can help D community this way, but the language is not mature enough to use it in industrial projects.

This was my IMHO


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I'm a 'hobby' programmer, but since I almost learned the ANSI/ISO C++ I think I'm going stay with this one. Maybe I will learn D later, but I'm first going to learn some libary's :)

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