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firahs

Mac Programming :)

10 posts in this topic

I do all my programming on a Mac. Part of the reason I think no does it is because no one does it. I only know of a couple of game programming books for Mac, and they are both about 5 years old. There are hardly any resources on the internet for Mac programming, except Apple's website, so it's hard to find help. After learning to program Windows/DirectX, I love my Mac even more!
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I've done a little programming on a mac, and the reason I didn't really like it was because it was so damn easy to crash it The memory protection on it sucked(this was system 7.5, I haven't used anything newer). So that's why I stuck with windows. I only had about half the chance of crashing the whole computer when I slipped

Jonathan

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I started programming on Apple machines (to this day, I shed a tear everytime I see an Apple IIgs :~) ). My natural progression was to try the Macs, but by school forbade their use for anything but wordprocessing and CAD. So I went to the PC and was happy.
When I started going to college, they tought us c++ on the Mac. I pulled my hair many many times at "Error: -1" WTF is that? Reference books are not found (at my school). At least on NT when I get a "Memory cannot be 'read'" message and I know I did something foolish with pointers (e.g. NULL->Next()). I am not against Mac programming. As a matter of fact I want my game to be crossplatform since 50% of my friends own a Mac. However I find little to no resource on the subject and I don't want to spend an arm and leg to purchase a Mac when I'm still trying to buy a better PC

If anyone know of any good Mac programming (does not have to be game related) references, please mention them.

Thanks,
OberonZ

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I was getting the same kind of error messages. I think there's an error.h file that has a bunch of #defines that'll help you a bit

Jonathan

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The mac I'm sitting in front of right now told me to tell you, it hasn't stoped crashing for the last 4 hours. Maybe that's why I won't program on one. Programming for one is a diffrent story, I want all those saps who were foolish enough to buy an Imac to buy my games too...I figure they ought to buy 2 or 3 maybe I'll change the color of the package & sell more! Whoo Hoo
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The reason why I don't program on macs is this:
1) There far too expensive
2) I find Windows much nicer and easier to use
3) All of the Macs i've used have been much more unstable then my Win98 system
4) Most people have Windows PC's.

To be fair, I haven't used the latest MacOS so some of these problems may have been fixed. But I'm plenty happy with my Windows system right now.

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i have to agree, when my program futzs out and i get an error like -13, it isnt very descriptive.......yeah that was kinda annoying, yeah right eva, i couldnt pay you enough money to sit infront of a mac

[This message has been edited by firahs (edited November 07, 1999).]

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Here are some good Mac programming docs: http://developer.apple.com/techpubs/macos8/mac8.html

As for error codes, well, look in errors.h or learn to use a source level debugger (that comes with most IDEs) or the low level debugger Macsbug: ftp://ftp.apple.com//devworld/Tool_Chest/Testing_-_Debugging/Debuggers_-_dcmds/MacsBug_6.6.sit.hqx

Apple has almost as much information online as Microsoft does. Check it out at: http://www.apple.com/developer

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I tried MacsBug once, and only once. That's the most confusing debugger I've ever had my paws on gdb is easier than that

Jonathan

P.S. And codewarrior never caught the bombs in time. GWorlds are dangerous things to play with I guess

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i know what all the error codes mean but some people dont, so i think it might be intimidating for people who dont...but hey, at least it wont crash out on me if the code is good (unlike a certain OS that rhymes with blindows)

as for the debugger, yeah the debugger that comes with codewarrior is relatively useless, im sure that there are some 3rd part debuggers that you can use...but does any one remember the debugger that came with THINK C or THINK pascal, it was called lightsbug....now that rocked the house, i might have to talk to the good people at metrowerks

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Even though im a regular on the great irc channel, im still not sure why everyone is soooooo against programming on a mac. I mean if you program on linux, i would understand. But from my experience compiling on a mac, even for windows can lead to a lower blood pressure and an overall more enjoyable experience, all without a loss of power. I guess i just wanted to know if this is because people have had bad experience with a mac, or if it is because they have never used one and just saying what they hear from others.
>:
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