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Wavinator

"Klingonness" (Or "Orcishness," if you prefer)

27 posts in this topic

I know we like to think we are so cool, and so intelligent, but what about taking inspiration from other animals ?

I mean, if you want exotic mentalities, all you''ve to do is to go out and look at the nature around. Even in a town, just look at the insects, there is plenty of interesting stuff going on.

In those weird societies, you see females eating males, you see slavery, you see self sacrifice, you see cannibalism, as for random murders ... do you know a lot of predators species that could survive without killing ? And the argument that you don''t kill other people of your kind doesn''t hold water very long when survival of the fittest is all that counts.

The problem/difference is that we humans seem to have developed a terrible/wonderful thing called consience, and we use it a lot, for good and bad deeds.

One thing I wanted to mention. It''s always funny how you have all those worlds in the galaxy that always seem to consist of one unified system, one climate, one species.
It seems we always assume that travel to space would imply a unified Earth... and the rest of the universe would be the same.

This is soooo bland. I mean, look at all the diversity of the homo sapiens sapiens, and the number of species on Earth, and all we see in sci fi, is one planet, one dominating species, one associated culture. Isn''t there a culture of peaceful, spiritual Klingons ? Or a culture of warmongers Vulcans ?

youpla :-P
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quote:
Original post by ahw

I mean, if you want exotic mentalities, all you''ve to do is to go out and look at the nature around. Even in a town, just look at the insects, there is plenty of interesting stuff going on.



You know, a really well done Hive society would be so cool. No real sense of individuality, just the guiding soul of the Hive. You might not even be able to trade or talk with them, and their actions would be all you''d have to judge them by.

quote:

It''s always funny how you have all those worlds in the galaxy that always seem to consist of one unified system, one climate, one species.
It seems we always assume that travel to space would imply a unified Earth... and the rest of the universe would be the same.



Yeah, you know, this actually can be pretty cool, or lame, depending on how much it''s used. It can be interesting to contemplate a monoclimate world, like Dune (deserts) or Degoba (jungle) just because we''ve never seen anything like that. But on the other hand, when you keep coming to "X," the _insert Earth climate here_ planet, it''s just plain lazy.

quote:

Isn''t there a culture of peaceful, spiritual Klingons ? Or a culture of warmongers Vulcans ?



Yes, actually! Whorf met pacified Klingons in one episode. (Klingons had crash landed with Romulans and had learned to live together.) And in another, Cpt. Picard had to stop Vulcan dissidents who wanted to unearth a powerful psionic weapon from out of Vulcan''s past.

The point is, though, that these groups might not have been striking if it weren''t for the baseline that got established by the stereotype.



--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...
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Wavinator : and here we go back to the stereotypes again
I don''t understand why we couldn''t us them. I mean, we are not totally different, or totally the same ... I am a french guy, so like the vast majority of french men, I have a sense of humour that say, an american just won''t get (tried and tested) no matter how hard I try to explain. But any french man I meet will usually get it ... I am only unique because of my conscience saying so to myself. Cogito ergo sum. We assume this to be so true that we push it to the limit where everybody is an atomic being, distinct from the rest of the world. No, this doesn''t work ! There *are* stereotypes, as soon as there are groups, and since we are a social being, there HAS to be groups.
We gather by similarities.
On Earth we gather geographically, usually, then by lots of other criteria. With the arrival of the Net, people are not restricted anymore by geographic location, Gamedev for instance, is typical of this... there are lots of yankees, some english (I won''t use the irish word for them ), some australorednecks, I even came across a chinese, but all people interested by game programming.

To give unicity to each people, you need a referential. that this referential be purely theoretical is ok, but it exists nonetheless. And I don''t want to hear any politically correct bullshit about not emphasizing our differences because, oh!, it could hurt someone''s feelings ... fuck that !

mmmh, ok, I guess I am digressing now.

youpla :-P
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