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[java] online java editor ?

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I have been searching the net but come up short... Does anyone know of a online java editor that need no installation ? It's like this. I work as a security guard right now, (sucks), and have a lot of time on my hands since at nighttime, nothing much happens. I could actually spend some time coding every night at work since I have acess to the internet and a fairly good computer. The thing is, I am not allowed to install any programs on this computer but I am allowed to surf the net and use any installed program I wish, my employer is quite generous with those sort of things. What I am looking for is something like a texteditor applet with syntax highlighting that I can run on this computer, connected to a server on my home computer where the actual code will be stored and compiled. soo, Does anyone know of a thing like this, or something similar ?

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install linux, setup a secure shell server, install emacs or vim, login to your own computer from work and code.

You could setup a secure shell server on windows, but I don't know of any console text editors that have syntax highlighting on windows. You can get xemacs and gvim, but they aren't console programs.

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Offhand, I don't know of any online java editors. If you're running Windows XP, consider remotely connecting to your computer using its built in technology or netmeeting through Start->Run->type "conf". If you're running an older version of windows, also look into netmeeting. It's a powerful program that also allows remote access to your computer.

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If you do use Linux, you can set up a VNC server on it, which essentially works like X in that you can view your desktop remotely with a VNC client. There are Java applet VNC clients that let you connect to a VNC server and essentially view your desktop in your web browser. These do require more bandwidth than just telnet or SSH, but they let you view graphical applications as well.

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Quote:
Original post by Matei
If you do use Linux, you can set up a VNC server on it, which essentially works like X in that you can view your desktop remotely with a VNC client. There are Java applet VNC clients that let you connect to a VNC server and essentially view your desktop in your web browser. These do require more bandwidth than just telnet or SSH, but they let you view graphical applications as well.


VNC is crossplatform. It works on Windows and Mac too. However you would be advised that even on a 100mbps LAN VNC is incredibly slow.

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Uh... guys?

Quote:
Original post by JOL
The thing is, I am not allowed to install any programs on this computer but I am allowed to surf the net and use any installed program I wish


Thus he was hoping to find a way to do this via an applet or something like that.

Assuming you have any decent text editor in that set of "installed program(s)", my recommendation would be to set up your home computer as a web server and set up an upload script on it via CGI.

Or, if you don't mind the utter lack of security, you could use an existing interface for this, such as the one normally used in the #gamedev IRC channel.

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Thank's all for the replies - I'll probably do what Zahlman adviced, although I can't see why IDE's and for that matter any program couldn't be made to run directly from off a CD and have some sort of online save function/server for maintaining the code.

Basically a emacs or sumthing that don't need installation on the Client side connected to a simple sftp server.

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If you run XP at home, you can enable the "Remote Desktop" feature, and either connect to it using the Remote Desktop Connection utility that comes with XP, the Terminal Services client you might find/install on other Windows versions, or use the ActiveX client in a browser. The ActiveX client can be downloaded at: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/downloads/tools/rdwebconn.mspx.

If there is a way to access a VNC server with a browser (other than using the $475 activex component a quick google revealed), I'd love to hear about it.

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Quote:
Original post by Brian Sandberg
If there is a way to access a VNC server with a browser (other than using the $475 activex component a quick google revealed), I'd love to hear about it.


There used to be a browser-launched Java VNC. However, it did get really really bad for a year or so (unusable - far too slow).

The best place for anyone using VNC is to switch to TightVNC - it's actively developed, and has newer and better compression algos etc.

Also, FYI to the person who said VNC is slow: you probably used the windows version(s)?. For some reason or other (*ahem* lots of anti-windows people around the Cambridge lab, perhaps?) the original VNC team never bothered to make VNC on windows - they just made a half-arsed client and server neither of which worked properly. One of them (client or server) supported NONE of the compression schemes, certainly it didn't have the hex-encoding (which was the main feature of VNC). It was probably a case of someone was accessing windows from unix, or vice versa, and only implemented that way around :(.

...which is where TightVNC became very useful for a lot of us, since it has a full windows implementation, both C and S.

FYI I was using Tight 3 years ago on dialup connections without problems. But the java client, as noted above, was really bad around 2002/2003; perhaps it's fixed by now?

----

To original poster: are you allowed to reboot the machine? Does it have much RAM? If so, it's possible to make a linux CD-OS that does what you want, using a RAM-disk for the things that need to change whilst running, and to save source files whilst you're compiling etc. Then you just have to FTP from the RAM disk to your home PC before you switch off / reboot the PC :).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You'll have a difficult/impossible time doing any of that if the lan has a strict firewall.

I've tried setting up a telnet server on my at home xp machine but I couldn't connect to it with telnet even on port 80. What port is telnet normally on?

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I've tried setting up a telnet server on my at home xp machine but I couldn't connect to it with telnet even on port 80. What port is telnet normally on?
23 IIRC

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I've tried setting up a telnet server on my at home xp machine but I couldn't connect to it with telnet even on port 80. What port is telnet normally on?


Firstly, make sure you're using the right syntax for your telnet client to connect to numbered ports (some have trange syntax).

Secondly, if you do NOT specify a number, it should automatically use the telnet port.

Thirdly, NEVER USE TELNET. Not ever. Not even if your life depends upon it. There is *no* reason to use telnet for anything (OK, maybe there is in some really extreme cases - e.g. your client or server is a 286 with 64k of RAM and can't run SSH).

You *must* use SSH for everything, because if you don't then you are broadcasting (*) your username + password to everyone on the net. For windows, the standard SSH client is "putty" (it's free) and acts like a telnet client on steroids - it can do colours properly, it can save bookmarks to different servers, and has loads of fancy options if you ever want them, most of which you'll never need.

I'm not sure what the best options are for windows when setting up an SSH server...

(*) Not in the technical sense, but certainly any computer on your tracert / traceroute will have your username and password.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Eclipse is an excellent editor and I don't think you need to install it.
http://www.eclipse.org/

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