Sign in to follow this  
Arsene Zanetti

Choosing Unix/Linux Platform

Recommended Posts

Arsene Zanetti    122
Hi, I'm fed up with Windows, especially with Visual Studio, and I've just got a new laptop, so I'm thinking about using Unix or Linux. However, I haven't used either Unix or Linux before, so I'd like your advice. The following are the considerations: I'm going to study in Australia, so I think I need a software that can use Microsoft Office's documents. An option is to partition the harddisk and have both Windows and Unix/Linux. If that's the case then the Unix/Linux part will be used mainly for programming only, so GUI or friendly interfaces is not important. The other option is to have Unix/Linux only. If that's the case I would prefer(though not necessary) a GUI and more friendly interface. And, which Unix/Linux should I choose? My friend advised me Mandrake Linux. I've searched the web a bit, and Mandrake Linux looks quite satisfying. But I'd like to hear more about it and other options. Please give me some advice. Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
OpenOffice for MS Office documents.
As you said, dual-booting would probably be a good option since you don't have any experience with unix or linux.
On the other hand using linux exclusively on the machine will force you to get used to it, making you more fluent with it faster.
As for distribution to use there are many good ones. Personally I would recommend arch linux or slackware but I'm sure others would not recommend those for a beginner. Maybe mandrake, fedora or suse would suit you better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
flukus    138
What in particular is pissing you off about Visual Studio? Because I can tell you know it's probably the program you will miss the most!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
einki    122
suse for complete beginners
fedora for beginners
is my advice

Do not worry about the nice guy use KDE (included with all main distributions) and you will have a very easy gui maybe easier
than windows

by
einKI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zeon    122
suse and fedora are in my opinion the best distros to start
an interesting alternative would be to use knoppix and install it on your harddisk... just a thought *gg* (in case you do this, give a quick post of your exp with it)

but before your start setting up linux on your notebook do a lot of googling about it combined with linux

that especially usefull in case of extra buttons on your notebook like volume-control etc.

for programming:
kdevelop under kde is quite nice
but i prefer anjuta and gnome as gui

openoffice is a nice suite that will replace office

in case of dualboot:
always make the first partition windows... a friend of mine didn't do that and the only help was to reinstall it *gg*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ame noire    122
Easy to install and maintain: www.debian.org
Not so easy to install but something if you want really learn things about Linux/Unix: www.gentoo.org

RedHat is also recommendable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Arsene Zanetti    122
I've gone through the web, but I found little out of it, except suse, fedora being easier while arch and slackware being harder but more powerful.

Can someone tell me more definitely about different distributions please?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ame noire    122
I think you cannot give a specific advice, try them, most of them are downloadable for free and choose which one suites you best. You can install nearly everything from one distibution on another so don't be worried missing something by taking the wrong distribution. If you take SuSe or Redhat you will get the most Windows-like feeling to it in my opinion so this is maybe a good start (and they come also with tons of software).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bobstevens    204
If you really need to use Office it may be worth your time to setup a dual boot system. Lots of stuff claims to read .doc but you'll find that a .doc will look different in every software package you open it in. If you have to use .doc, MS Word is the only way to go.

What I did was keep a copy of Abiword around on my roaming Windows desktop at school, and a copy on my Linux box. I just used TRF and printed from Abi in a lab when I needed to. It worked out pretty nice, but you still may have to shuffle a little between Linux and Windows Abiword.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
joanusdmentia    1060
The key word to look for in the menu is 'terminal'.

Or you can hold down Alt-Ctrl and press any of F1 through F6. That should give you several fullscreen textmode terminals. (Unless of course they don't run virtual terminals on them anymore in Fedora, which I doubt)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
metal leper    151
it's fedora that need spitting on, not you!

alt+f2 in gnome should bring up a sort of command line - if you can't find a terminal program in the gnome menus (when I tried Fedora I found one in the gnome menu, but not the kde one) type terminal or gnome-terminal in there, and hopefully one of them will give you a terminal (easier than having to switch to a virtual console). If you have kde installed as well, typing konsole will do the job too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sSimontis    100
Also, a very good site is www.linxuquestions.org. They have a Linux HCL, an active forum, Linux news briefs, and all sorts of other stuff. It is one of the best Linux sites I have seen. Good luck with Linux!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this