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JMOmandown

[.net] Why use the .Net Framework

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JMOmandown    103
I have decided not to require my clients to use the .net framework in order to run .net programs, instead I have decided to use third party programs to compile directly into native code and only include the snippets of the framework required in a single executable file for the program thus eliminating both file size and inconvience for the client. However while this is a satisfactory option and works well it is also very costly in the finance departement, which is why I am curious, anybody else know of any other 'reasonable' solutions?

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CWIZO    118
If you are shiping the sowtware on the CD, I see no problem.
I see no problem as there are more and more brod-band connections.

And they will only have to install it once and they will be able to run all otehr .NET applications.

I really don't see why there is all the fuss with omg it's a 20mb download. Download once and forget you downloded.

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alnite    3438
Quote:
Original post by CWIZO
If you are shiping the sowtware on the CD, I see no problem.

Agreed. You can include .NET Framework if you distribute your application in CDs. If you don't, then it all depends on Microsoft. Early version of Windows XP is shipped with .NET Framework 1.0 installed (I don't know the later version, maybe they include 1.1). So if you develop your application for .NET Framework 1.0, your applications are guaranteed to run on any PC running Windows XP (regardless of how old it is).

Quote:

I really don't see why there is all the fuss with omg it's a 20mb download. Download once and forget you downloded.

Well, it's not actually that simple for 56k users. 20mb is quite big and might take a couple of days to finish depending on how and when you connect to the Internet. You can let it download overnight, but for some average Joe computer users, it's very unlikely to happen. They don't even get the idea to download the .NET Framework.

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evolutional    1393
Being that the .NET framework is an integral part of the next version of windows (Longhorn) then I see it as important. Microsoft has pretty much bet it company on .NET and when an organisation that size takes that risk, it holds a lot of weight. Many of Microsoft's Next Generation products are based on .NET (SQL server 2005/visual studio 2005, etc) and so your clients will probably be wondering why you're not keeping up with the current standards. .NET may not be 'huge' now, but in the next few years, managed code and .NET will be the norm for many organisations and those not using it will eventually go the way of the 16-bit programmers. When Mono and dotGNU are fully working (if they're not already), you will be able to run your applications across several platforms too and that can only be a good thing for businesses.

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markr    1692
Political reasons aside, the .NET framework has a lot of useful functions.

Particularly for business applications, features like serialisation, containers, straightforward (mostly) Unicode support, decent XML support etc, are compelling. Not that Java doesn't also have them, but the .NET framework benefits from learning from Java's mistakes. The .NET equivalents are generally slightly simpler to use. There is less legacy than in Java.

I would definitely not choose a programming language for political reasons, only practical or personal preference. Ok so "personal preference" could be construed as a political reason, but it isn't really, as I'm only trying to please myself.

A practical reason NOT to use it might be "I don't want people to have to download a 20+mb framework to play my 500k shareware game"

Mark

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Promit    13246
Quote:
Original post by JMOmandown
instead I have decided to use third party programs to compile directly into native code and only include the snippets of the framework required in a single executable file for the program thus eliminating both file size and inconvience for the client.


I'm very curious about the details of how you do this; it could be very useful for the smaller programs I write.


Other than that, .NET is the future, really. For the 56k users who need to wait for a CD version of the Framework...well, not much I can say.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Its 20 megabytes. That's about six minutes on broadband (not even sure its that long).

They're going to need it sooner or later - .NET 1.1 is going to be included in Service Pack 2.

Sooner, or later, they'll have it. They'll always have it.

Virus, you see.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Early version of Windows XP is shipped with .NET Framework 1.0 installed (I don't know the later version, maybe they include 1.1). So if you develop your application for .NET Framework 1.0, your applications are guaranteed to run on any PC running Windows XP (regardless of how old it is).


For the record, Windows XP never included the .Net Framework. .Net 1.0 was released Feb 2002, while XP was released in Oct 2001.

Users must download the Microsoft .NET Framework Version 1.1 Redistributable Package here.

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JesseT    402
A large percentage of the source code written for the next version of the Windows OS, codenamed Longhorn, is managed code. Roughly 90 percent of the code is managed, according to a MSDN TV episode. The Longhorn SDK is a superset of the .NET Framework. So you can be safely assured that .NET is the future--Microsoft is betting their next OS on it.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Windows XP has been shipping with .NET 1.1 for a long time, now. You're not going to get it in the retail versions, but OEM copies are a go, yo.

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Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by markr
A practical reason NOT to use it might be "I don't want people to have to download a 20+mb framework to play my 500k shareware game"

Mark


How big is DirectX 9, and which versions of Windows is it included with out of the box?

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Promit    13246
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
How big is DirectX 9


Quote:

File Name: dxwebsetup.exe

Download Size: 10 KB - 166666 KB


Uh...hard to say.

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