Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ARCHIGAMER

[java] Why did you go with java?

Recommended Posts

ARCHIGAMER    122
Why did you decide to learn java? I decided to learn java due to all the technolegies and the simplicity over c++. I wish there was a button on my monitor to turn up the intellegince. Theres a button called 'brightness' but it doesn't work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
loserkid    122
Greetings,

Well I started to learn java for probably the wrong reason: it had alot of hype. Other than the hype,I learned Java had some attractive features, such as good networking, strong object orientation, ease of use over c++ (like you mentioned ), mutli-platform, and it could run in a Browser!! (which was really cool to me at the time)

p.s. I really enjoy your signature ARCHIGAMER. it''s sweet.

=============================
a wise man once said....
=============================
www.thejpsystem.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mbarela    122
I was pretty much a die hard c++ programmer for a number of years, with no real interest in learning or using java. Sometimes im closed minded about things like programming languages. About five months ago I got a game programming job that required me to know java, so thats why I learned it. After about a month of using java I have learned that it really is a great language, easy to use language. I have some complaints, but I would recomend it as a good first language for people getting into game programming. It really allows you to focus on basic game programming concepts and not on learning a complicated api.

Mike Barela
mbarela@earthlink.net

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jerry Lynn    122
Most of my professional work is in non-multimedia business applications. I started using Java to add client side functions to Intranet applications. We wanted to move away from CGI for our server side functionality and Java''s superior developer productivity over C++ and its higher scalability over VB made it the best choice for a number of projects.

Then we worked a project where the clients requested a multimedia application but were considering shifting platforms at some time in the future (from Windows to Linux - Even though JMF for Linux is not out yet it is expected to be long before the transition is to take place) - Java to the rescue again. When I saw how well Java 2D and JMF performed it was a natural choice to use Java for my game hobby programming.

I am a little nervous about the future of Java, though. I don''t know if Sun will be able to continue to straddle the fence between psuedo-open platform and proprietary technology. I think that Sun''s handling of SGI and Java 3D proves that they are willing to make decisions that are detrimental to the Java platform in the best interests of Sun (and who can blame them – they’re a corporation, not a charity).

We will continue to use Java because it makes the best business sense for a lot of our projects, but we do so with the realization that there is little to no difference between Sun/Java and Microsoft/(VB, Com, .Net, etc..). They are both proprietary technologies that will be directed towards the best interests of the companies who own them, rather or not that direction makes the most technical sense. Right now it’s just in Sun’s interest to be more accepting of the opinions of developers and other companies because they can’t make Java a success without help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
felonius    122
I had been using C++ for some years but was bothered by its many nuicanses but I had to live with it because it was the only language with proper support by third parties.

Then I for fun used a week with Java one summer and tried doing some programming with it and saw how much faster it was to program. I was dissappointed with the execution speed, though, a dropped it again until I became aware of all the methods there was to make Java go fast and how it could be combined with C++ for performance.

From then on I have been a true devote to the language that makes my life simpler than before.

Jacob Marner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
a2k    124
you can combine java with c++? how?

anyway, i learned java cuz my ex-girlfriend asked me for help in her java class, so i learned with her. it was fun, and sort of easy to use, but yes, i''m still caught up in the power of c++. i''m gonna have to learn extensive java for my final year university project, but hopefully, it won''t be TOO hard to pick up the real guts of the language.

how hard is it to learn (design-wise) if i think that i''m really seasoned in c++?

a2k

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ARCHIGAMER    122
Thank you loserkid I got it from a tip of the day screen from "Sam Spade" a program that gets info about networks. Java can be combined with C++ by the "Java native interface" I believe i might have it mixed up with another technolgy.

I wish there was a button on my monitor to turn up the intellegince.
Theres a button called 'brightness' but it doesn't work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Devon    122
Well there wasn''t much choice, my university decided they were going to scrap c++ and teach java only. *sigh* but on the bright side I now know how to properly use object orientation concepts, and how much cleaner and easier to understand code can be. As for java''s execution speed, well let''s just say it''s not as fast as i would like it to be. Still gotta try combining it with c++

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ao    122
I use it because people pay me to use it. It bugs me though... I still have fun using it, but prefer c/c++ and directX... I think once I get a little more use to it then I will feel the same about both c/c++ and java.

ao

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jerry Lynn    122
>>you can combine java with c++? how?

Check out the section on ''Native Methods'' in the FAQ... it will give you a short intro and point you where to get more information.

http://games.cpbinc.com/faq/pf.asp#t6

After that you might want to check out the part of the FAQ on C++ and Native Code (just use the navigation bar to the left).

When I get back to the office on Monday I will move the answer on ''Native Methods'' to the C++ section of the FAQ (it currently resides in the ''Performance'' section - I can''t recall why I put it there?).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aldacron    4544
Java was actually the first language I learned, but once I got into C I pretty much dropped Java. I''ve been current with the changes from version to version, but haven''t produced anything with it in a while. Now, in order to have some things for people to do on my website, I''m preparing to go back to it again to code up some applet games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Delisk    122
Java is the first (and only) language tath i know!

I look at hother and java seem to have a goos ratio betwen performence and easy, yhea i know VB is more easy but way to limited + i prefer compiled code!

Delisk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aldacron    4544
Archigamer (I always read your name as ARCHIMAGER)-

JNI can improve performance if used properly. For example, if you wanted to write a JNI interface to, say, DirectDraw, then the chances are that your graphics code will be faster. On the other hand, if you were interfacing JNI with DirectX through another lib like Allegro, now you're dealing with sheer slowness (this from experience).

Also there are other things to consider. Some of the latest compilers have imporved the performance of pure java quite a bit. JDK1.3 javac is much better than the older versions. It's possible that you won't see much of a difference between JNI-enabled apps and Pure Java these days, and even less in the future.

Edited by - Aldacron on September 24, 2000 8:41:19 PM

Edited by - Aldacron on September 24, 2000 8:41:53 PM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
archon    122
I learned a small amount of C before learning Java, and due to Java''s ground up OO design, the concepts were easier to learn. As I''ve expanded into C++ for games, it is striking to me how similar the two languages are. Aside from the quirks of C++, I''d say you learn one, you know the other, but that was coming from Java into C++. I don''t know what it is like the other way around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SteveMeister    122
I learned Java because it was mandated for a project I was working on almost 4 years ago. Since then, I''ve programmed almost exclusively in Java.

Before Java though, I started out in the early 80''s in BASIC, FORTRAN and Pascal, then spent about 10 years programming exclusively in C, followed by a very brief stint of C++ and then Java.

Java''s by far my favorite programming language -- the syntax is clean, it''s easy to read, and easy to manage, but the best thing about Java is all the API''s.

- JavaDoc -- an excellent tool.
- Java2D -- wonderful 2D graphics library that depending on your platform is actually hardware accelerated
- JavaBeans -- well I suppose my favorite thing about these is ease of introspection. It''s a piece of cake to discover the bean''s properties and their set/get methods.
- EJB''s -- the most amazing, incredible and useful technology I''ve encountered in 21 years of programming. jBoss rules! B-)
- Swing -- a very comprehensive set of GUI components. While it''s still got some bugs, it is very nice, and PLAF is great.

I could go on & on. Every day I find out more cool things about Java and its API''s. And Java is constantly improving too, in terms of the language, API''s, tools, and performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
deakin    122
I use Java because it took care of a lot of things that really annoyed me when using C++ and it also forces you to program in "good style". I learned the basics a year ago so I could try making applets for websites, then dropped it for a while. Only recently I''ve been investigating more of the GUI stuff and making applications. I''ve also been reading the online book "Thinking in Java" by Bruce Eckel (http://www.bruceeckel.com) which has been very helpful.

- Daniel
VG Games

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shannon Barber    1681
I don''t have any experience with java;
I haven''t haven''t had much experience with java applets, because I avoid them like old vb code.

The little experience i do have with applets is novell''s new set of programs to setup and configure thier netware 5 nos. They are the worst excuse for software I have ever seen. It is painful to run those crappy apps; like word on a dx33 w/win311.
They crash a lot too.

Are all complex java apps that bad? I''ve seen applets that didn''t suck too bad, but not programs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ARCHIGAMER    122
Java can handle very complex programs without to much of a problem take "forte" for example that is complex if you ask me and its smooth if you have the system requirements or swap file advantages.

I wish there was a button on my monitor to turn up the intellegince.
Theres a button called 'brightness' but it doesn't work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites