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the_cyberlord

OpenGL .ASE to OpenGL Code

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Has someone allready made, or can someone make a convertor that converts ASCII 3D (ASE) to OpenGL GL_TRIANGLES code? It would be handy if you want to make your programs run as fast as possible but of course, you'd have to compile again everytime your model changes. But this could be made a bit faster by separating the file that draws you OpenGL model for your other code.

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Wouldn't the fastest method be to load the mesh from an external file at runtime, save it in a display list, and use that display list, rather than performing GL_TRIANGLE calls every frame (even if they are compiled into the program)?

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Quote:

Well ehh, maybe, I don't know, it was just an Idea, but you could also save the TRIANGLES calls in a display list... and there's no loading time


and what about animation?

there is a libASE which can load your ase model files into a `reasonable` format.
however I didn't manage to get things working for my 3dsmax's ASE exporter doesn't work right ( it exports illegal stuff ).

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Quote:
Original post by the_cyberlord
oh yeah, I forgot about animation!

but say, if you need no animation.


vertex arrays are faster or at least same the fast as display lists, and vertex array ranges are faster ;D

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I have a converter. I've never used it and I don't know where I got it from. According to the ReadMe.txt file, it was made by Philippe Kunzle and a future update is to make it create vertex arrays so it probably uses triangles.

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Ignoring from the poor rendering performance of glBegin/glEnd batches of triangles, you shouldn't even think about rendering an object with n lines of code per vertex. Model data is just that; data, therefore you should store it in a data structure and render it in a loop (or a vertex array/VBO if you want to speed things up).

If you have even a basic understanding of programming you should be able to do that. If you can't then you're probably not ready to learn OpenGL.

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