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Choice of Compiler

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Ok, i did a 'lil 3D engine with basic stuff (vertex,texture mapping, some homemade vertex shaders) with VB6 and Direct3D8... while coding this i encountered some problems because vb does not have support for Pointers, so i decided to go with C++. Now i need to know what would be the best IDE to devlop a game (or an engine). I looked at Borland C++BuilderX Personnal CD for 10$ US, sounds a great deal, but i dont wanna buy something that won't let me do what i want...i'm planning on using DirectX9. Thank you.

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I think the MSVC++ IDE/Compiler is the best for windows programs and things like that (especially DirectX). I think you can get a free introductory compiler for MSVC++, but you can't distribute the games on it but its good to learn from. There is also Dev-C++ which is also pretty good and it's free. If you choose MSVC++, you can either download the free 2005 Beta Version or buy a 2003 .Net version. Correct me if I am wrong.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Why don't you try the GNU GCC Windows port - MingW, or get Dev-C++ from http://www.bloodshed.net/, they are free. You can also try the Intel C++ compiler which I think is free for non commercial use.

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Microsoft's Visual C++ .NET is the best IDE I have ever used.

You can get the 7.1 compiler VC++ compiler for free now, check here.

There's IDEs for the windows port of GCC, MinGW from both Parinya and BloodShed - which are both free, but not as good as the MS VC++ IDE.

Digital Mars are offering a Free C/C++ compiler too, which you may want to check out.

You might want to check out this thread for some useful information on alternative IDEs and compilers too.

If you want to develop .NET programs, you can check out SharpDevelop which reminds me a lot of Visual Studio in functionality.

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I personally like dev C++. evem though I have mscv 6.0, I never use it. it is rather complex for the begginer, and for some reason, just seems harder to use(I am a begginer to, but I think im far enough to know)

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I'd go with MSVC or Bloodshed. MSVC *Pro* has a few extras, but Bloodshed gets the job done just as well (and for free). If you really wanted to, you could download the MSVC compiler (the actual command-line compiler is free), and tell Bloodshed to use it.

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Original post by The Plan 9 Hacker
I'd start out with VS 6.0. It'd be cheaper by today's new compilers, and yet you have a good amount of functionability.


I have to strongly disagree, VS 6.0 is not worth the savings, it should be considered broken and obsolete. I agree with everyone who is saying get VC++.net 2003 or Dev C++.

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I hate .NET because its bulky slow and difficult to distribute, I use Visual studio 6.0 though and love it. Eventually I'll move to .net just because its the industry standard but that doesn't make it suck any less.

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Original post by xegoth
I hate .NET because its bulky slow and difficult to distribute, I use Visual studio 6.0 though and love it. Eventually I'll move to .net just because its the industry standard but that doesn't make it suck any less.


If you mean the IDE, then I used to agree with you. However, I've come to find the VS.NET IDE far more productive. If you mean the VC6 compiler however, then I'm afraid it does just suck. The VS.NET compiler is far better.

You could buy the VS6 IDE, and plug in the new compiler however... Dunno if that'll work, but I can't see why not.

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If you're willing to spend the money, go with VC++.NET. It'll be well worth it.

Otherwise, I'd go Dev-C++. You're lucky you're using DX8 because I haven't figured out how to get Dev-C++ to work with DX9.

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
Why don't you try the GNU GCC Windows port - MingW, or get Dev-C++ from http://www.bloodshed.net/, they are free. You can also try the Intel C++ compiler which I think is free for non commercial use.

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Original post by Anonymous Poster
You can also try the Intel C++ compiler which I think is free for non commercial use.



You can't use Intel C++ Compiler for Win unless you have VStudio
Software Requirements to Develop IA-32 Applications on an IA-32 System

http://www.intel.com/software/products/compilers/cwin/sysreq.htm

Windows* NT* 4.0 with Service Pack 6 or higher, Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003 family
Note: Microsoft Windows 98, Windows 98 SE*, and Windows Millennium Edition* are no longer supported.
Supported Microsoft Visual Studio environments
Microsoft* Visual C++* 6.0 Professional Edition or higher
Microsoft Visual Studio* 6.0 Professional Edition or higher
Microsoft* Visual Studio .NET 2002 or 2003, Professional Edition or higher
Microsoft* Visual C++ .NET 2002 or 2003, Standard Edition or higher
Microsoft Macro Assembler (MASM) Version 7.00.9466 or later is required if you want to use options that produce or operate on assembly files.
The Intel C++ Compiler is not designed to be used in the Watcom* development environment.

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Quote:
Original post by fireblade
Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
You can also try the Intel C++ compiler which I think is free for non commercial use.



You can't use Intel C++ Compiler for Win unless you have VStudio


Yes you can. The Intel C++ Compiler integrates very well into VisualStudio, but you can use any generic IDE you want (or none at all).

cya,
Drag0n

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Wow, thats a chance i checked that box that tells me by email someone replyed to my thread loool...never received any

anyway, as i can see a lot of you recommands VS.net...wich i have, but, i thought leaving microsoft aside was a good long term decision. Correct me if im wrong, but can i code my c++ in an iso/ansi style in vsc++.net, i mean, without anything "windows"(except for god damm directX) ?

i read something too about Managed C++ with .net... after i read the article i thought : "Another way for being sticked to microsuck". What do you guys think about that?

I don't mind coding for windows now because it is the current OS standard, but as you can see, Linux is getting bigger and bigger, eventually will get over microsuck... thats why i wanna make sure i'm learning and doing the right c++ (iso/ansi). Last question, if i compile my game with c++.net, will the end-user need the CLR or the .net framework installed?

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Dude, you're counting your eggs before they hatch. Choosing which compiler to use based on the supposed dominant OS 10 years from now is what I call "premature optimization."

This isn't Slashdot, you won't find much Microsoft-hating here. And despite some of Microsoft's shortcomings, they DO make some good products (DX, Visual Studio, .NET, etc.)

And just because you're coding for .NET doesn't mean you'll always be stuck on the Windows platform. A Linux port is forthcoming (if not done already).

If you truly want to platform-proof your code, go Java. Otherwise I see little point, once you learn the basics now it won't be hard to change 10 years down the road if the desktop standard really does change.

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Quote:
Original post by md_lasalle
Wow, thats a chance i checked that box that tells me by email someone replyed to my thread loool...never received any

anyway, as i can see a lot of you recommands VS.net...wich i have, but, i thought leaving microsoft aside was a good long term decision. Correct me if im wrong, but can i code my c++ in an iso/ansi style in vsc++.net, i mean, without anything "windows"(except for god damm directX) ?

i read something too about Managed C++ with .net... after i read the article i thought : "Another way for being sticked to microsuck". What do you guys think about that?

I don't mind coding for windows now because it is the current OS standard, but as you can see, Linux is getting bigger and bigger, eventually will get over microsuck... thats why i wanna make sure i'm learning and doing the right c++ (iso/ansi). Last question, if i compile my game with c++.net, will the end-user need the CLR or the .net framework installed?


You don't have to program in Managed C++ in VS.NET, it can also compile native code, and you aren't stuck to .NET, MS API's, or whatnot.

I'm not going to comment on the other stuff you said.

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Quote:
Original post by Odoacer
Dude, you're counting your eggs before they hatch. Choosing which compiler to use based on the supposed dominant OS 10 years from now is what I call "premature optimization."


The thing is i dont wanna waste time for something i'll have to re-learn in 5 years. Is Java a bit to heavy for games? i heard lots of people are saying so, and do you know about the other questions i asked, like if the end user needs CLR on his machine or the .net framework even if i dont use it...

anyway i'll follow you folks advice and go with vs.net since i have the enterprise version on disks and you guys have more experience thn me...

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Like python_regious said, you don't have to compile to .NET bytecode with VC++.NET. You can write regular C++ just fine.

But if you're planning on writing Managed C++ then yeah the user will need the .NET framework. But if you're not, then you don't have to worry about that. It works both ways.

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Quote:
Original post by Odoacer
Dude, you're counting your eggs before they hatch. Choosing which compiler to use based on the supposed dominant OS 10 years from now is what I call "premature optimization."
I would take that a step further and suggest that using C++ at all is premature optimization, but that's neither here nor there. ;)

Quote:
And just because you're coding for .NET doesn't mean you'll always be stuck on the Windows platform. A Linux port is forthcoming (if not done already).
Mono is quite mature already. As long as you stay away from Winforms, your .NET apps should run on all the operating systems that count: the Mono runtime can handle Nemerle, Boo, and IronPython without even requiring a recompile. (the last of which is particularly compelling because it and can interoperate with other .NET languages without any "glue" code at all, unlike CPython and C++)

(caveat: IronPython is only an alpha right now. It needs a bit of time to stew before it's production-code ready)

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