Sign in to follow this  

Advice needed, how to contract out art work?

This topic is 4857 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hi, In my own time Im working on a small 3d game, partly for fun, and partly to use as a demo at some point in the future. However, I have the artistic ability of a color-blind gerbil. My art requirements are quite small, 6-8 low poly, textured meshes (2 characters, the rest vehicles) with a few animations (three or four animations for the characters). Im quite willing to pay someone to complete this work to spec for me, however Im not exactly certain how to go about doing the deal. Should I come up with an amount of money to offer (and if so, any thoughts as to what sort of figure to offer?), or solicit quotes (how/where?)? As for legalities, I am not overly concerned about having exclusive rights to the assets, but I would want to make a single payment that got me the rights to use the assets for any projects without being liable for royalties or such. Is this realistic? Would it mean I should expect to pay more? Is there a rentacoder.com type site for artists somewhere that people normally go to for this kind of thing? Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
I don't have much experience here, but still...

1.You can use gamdev.net help forums, note you're willing to pay x $ for y task and about all conditions. There are also pages for artists like rentacode.com... althrought I have no url to handle, use google and check for prices there.

2.There are ppl which sell their models via their www pages. Those models are usually nicely done and often cost in the ~25$ range. The drawback is you would have to make animations yourself (or talk with the authors, maybe they will do it for some premium cash)

3.Just use free models, as long as it's only for demo many ppl allow for use of their objects for free (to be sure you can write them an email and ask for permission to use their objetcs in your demo)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My advice in this case would be hit anywhere artists like that frequent.

Say (roughly) "Hey, here's what I can pay, here's what I want done. I know it isn't much, but we will feature you in the credits and will keep you at the top of the list for future, better funded products"

Someone may bite and do it to get experience over money. Programmers aren't the only ones who need experience in the industry before they can get a job in it (the strange catch 22 of game making). Someone may see it and say "hey, i can do it and no real company will hire me, so I get a little money and something to show on my resume"

-Joe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ask around some of the artists for some quotes, post on some artists forums and chats asking for quotes as well. Do this to make sure you get a good idea of how much a reasonable offer is. Really though, you'll find that with a demo all you have to do is ask for help from an artist, payment shouldn't be needed at all.
Make sure your demo is playable, a lot of artists end up with programmers or people claiming they will work on a project wasting their time. By showing them a demo (do this before posting) no matter how crap the artwork it shows you are committed.
Thus needing no payment!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suggest just finding a single good artist, and trying to get him to work with you permanently.. The only drawback to doing it this way, is you have to find someone that is skilled, not annoying, someone you -want- to work with, and someone who is willing to get paid the exact same way you are, from a demo to get a job...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Alan,
Speaking from my own experience I can tell you that :

1. Yeah, what you are thinking of doing is very possible.

2. Artists can work for a flat fee and usually also for an hourly rate. Each with its cons and pros. With flat fee you know exactly how much you pay, but you mind find artists reluctant to do as many changes as you feel are necessary. And in an hourly rate you don't control the exact expense, but you will find the artist very willing to do changes.

3. Tell the artist in advance that you retain all rights to the graphic assets. Usually their only request will be to post it on their site (portfolio). Veteran artists might also ask more money for the rights.

4. Try deviantart.com for artists.

5. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 4857 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this