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dave

Do YOU keep having to rewrite ur engine/game?

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I find i keep seeing new and more efficient ways of doing things regarding the way the cde is programmed on the whole. I spose this is pretty good fro experience. ace

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The worst part about 'engine' design is that you'll never complete it. There's a million different ways to do something, each with ups and downs. I read somewhere that the Doom3 engine you see now is the one that made it out of several prototypes. Even the big guns have the same problem - the key is to fix you design if you want to see the end of the project. Without solid requirements and specifications, you're doomed to constantly revamping it and never finishing. That's what happened to me - I quit making engines and shifted my focus to the games. It's a lot better now :)

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"having to"?

I would think less of myself as a programmer if I didn't *enjoy* it.

(Of course, that does always need to be balanced with the need to get things done. Let the discovery of new game features drive the engine's development, if you can.)

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When you rewrite something, stop and think if the rewrite was needed because you were beeing lazy. If this was the case, you should spend more time on your design.

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It is called refactoring, and it means you're developing a nose for code smell. Usually, you should follow this hunch. The only exception I can think of is when you are very close to finishing, then it is even harder not to go back and rewrite *everything* (typically the reason is really stupid).

My projects folder has a ton of little projects that I test things out in such as improved Win32 API wrapper classes that I will later fold back into the real project. Testing classes in an isolated environment makes it a lot easier.

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Quote:
Original post by antareus
Testing classes in an isolated environment makes it a lot easier.


Not only is it easier, you're also promoting good resuabale code [smile]

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I think experiance reduces the amount of times you have to do it. But after more than 15 years, I still have to sometimes re-write stuff many times.

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