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how big is a 100 hours project?

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We're supposed to do this big project in school this year. At least 100 hours of work. Since programming is one of the things you can do, I want to do just that. But I'd like to know how big a project would have to be to fill up 100 hours. Or perhaps more importantly, how big a project can I sqeeze into 100 - 200 hours? I guess you'll need to know how good/bad I am... I've been a hobby programmer for about a year and half now, and I've just successfully completed a Direct3D9 wrapper for 2D-graphics. This is about the best I can do without having to follow tutorials by the letter.

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Well, imagine you work full time (on average 8 hours per day - yes ingnoring overtime... ;), 100 hours is only 12.5 working days, not even a fornight.

Simple Pong and Breakout clones can take that long, depending on your skill, maybe something like a simple Mario clone if your more talented than that.

It all depends on how good you are and what you think you can do, and who you will be working with. Do you have artists to help, or would that eat into your time?

Hope that helps
Spree

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Build a game or whatever from the ground up. Start with a good open base design and keep adding features, whis way you don't have to worry that much about the deadline.

Lets say you make a 3d engine and a game with it.

You start with a simple map format load that and draw it on the screen letting the player fly through the map with flymode. Lets say that would take 25 hours (maybe more or less).
Then you add lighting, another 10 hours to do it nice.
Then collision detection so you can let the player walk around.
Then a little monster with very basic AI (like hey a wall, lets turn into the opposite direction with a slight offset).
Then sound.
And then some optional features (like bumpmapping or shadows).

If you keep the base simple (like maps consisting of tiles which contain either floor or wall and monsters represented by a block) it shouldn't be that hard.

I don't know how much experience you have in 3d so this might be impossible for you (or not if you learn quick).

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What is your project evaluated for in the end? You say "programming", does it imply that you will only be accessed on the programming part. If so, you could ignore any art stuff but rudimentary graphics pretty much (enough to show off the graphics techniques you've implemented if the project is graphical).

Remember there is programming beyond graphics that can also be pretty interesting. ^^ One of the projects I recently did myself was a save game converter which converts save files of the game Europa Universalis 2, into the similar game Victoria which starts where EU2 ends. Needless to say this has been a pretty interesting and completely non-graphical experience; I had to write a file loader for the generic data format these games used.

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Unwise Owl

I can choose if I want an entire product, graphics and all, to be part of the project, or I can keep to the programming only. O' course, I'll need *some* kind of graphics, but if I keep to the programming only, I can just do it in paint.

EDIT: Same goes for sound as well.

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Back in my time that project was only 20 hours. I did a calculator app in C, using windows API.

Don't forget that you need to take into account the time required to write the report as well!

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Keep in mind that other thread: if you are getting evaluated by a non-programmer (you did not mention what kind of class it was for), they may not appreciate the work you put into it because they don't know anything about programming and how hard it really is!

"Wow... pong. This took you 100 hours? I was expecting more for some reason"

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Quote:
Original post by leiavoia
Keep in mind that other thread: if you are getting evaluated by a non-programmer (you did not mention what kind of class it was for), they may not appreciate the work you put into it because they don't know anything about programming and how hard it really is!

"Wow... pong. This took you 100 hours? I was expecting more for some reason"


Showing the source code will solve that problem. [grin]

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Quote:
Original post by leiavoia
Keep in mind that other thread: if you are getting evaluated by a non-programmer (you did not mention what kind of class it was for), they may not appreciate the work you put into it because they don't know anything about programming and how hard it really is!

"Wow... pong. This took you 100 hours? I was expecting more for some reason"


Heh! Luckily, it'll be evaluated by at least one "expert in the field", so that's not a problem.


Yeah, what mr BICEPS said. It's 100 hours for the entire development: Planning, designing, coding, report writing, everything.

Most people here seems to think a pretty "small" game will suffice. I was thinking about a astoriods clone with spiffier graphics. Shouldn't be too hard, should it?

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Asteroids would be perfect i think. Unless it's 3D, first person in-cockpit with lighting tricks, shadows, bump-mapping, yadda yadda yadda.

Actually, basic Asteroids with bigger explosions would be the best. Explosions are all that really matter. Ask anyone!

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Definately write a ray-tracer if you haven't written one before.

Raytracers give you the fastest nice results for least effort. Start off very basic, and you can easily add features until you reach your hours limit. Make it as big or as small as you like!

An easy way to impress your classmates too!

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I made a 3D Chess program complete with AI, user interface and 3D View of the chessboard in my 100-hour project + report. My report wasnt exactly top of the line but I knew my teacher wasnt exactly the sharpest knife in the drawer so it as OK :) Though I consider myself a somehat above average programmer so you might have to shoot for something smaller especially if you have to write a serious report and all that.

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When I was at University studying CompSci, we had a group project to undertake during the final 6 months of our course.

Because of my interest in computer games/graphics I managed to pursuade the others (3 other guys) to take on the challenge of planning, designing and building a multiplayer 3D game along with other demonstrations of our engines capability.

Now being the lazy buggers that we are, 5 months and 26 days into the project we actually sat down to do some work.

Between the four of us (noting that the other 3 had never touched DirectX in their lives) we managed to put together the game, the demonstration programs and a full A4 ringbinder full of project documentation. That's about 8000-10000 lines of code and 500 pages of documentation.

4 days and 4 nights we were awake - no sleep.

We managed to get 73% for the project, which was one of the highest marks given. (it equates to a 1st class degree mark)

So, for 100 hours work I would expect a pretty decent project. In 200 hours, I would expect alot more.

Jx

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Asteroids is something I've been thinking about as well, and raytracers sound cool...

But I've gotten another problem. How do you handle a teacher who's very suspicious and seems to think I'll download someone elses code behind his back?



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Document your code as it progresses. Every week or two, zip up your whole project folder and archive that as a "snapshot" to prove your work has been progressive and not ripped off. Alternatively, get a CVS and have them look in from time to time. That assumes of course that you actually spread the work out and don't try to cram the whole thing in on the last week. That *would* look suspicous. But i assume that the class will want you to report on your progress from time to time anyway.

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As an addendum to my previous post, and in reply to Kekko's last post:

Once a week during our project we had to have a meeting to discuss progress with our Project Supervisor. Obviously during ours we just blagged the whole year, but you could suggest a similar thing to your supervisor/teacher.

Leiavoia's suggestion is also a very good idea - that way, he'll be able to keep track of the project as it progresses and if anything goes drasitically wrong at your end - he'll have a backup of your code/docs :D

Jx

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Multiplayer anything might be risky if you've never done it before though, as it's bug-prone and frustrating for novices (in my own limited experience). It would be cool though. "That was my asteroid you jerk!"

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