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reccomondation of 3d theory books

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Hi Ive done some DirectX graphics programming for some time. But the books ive used hasnt covered the underlaying theory (math. etc) regarding 3D graphics. I would appreciate if i could get some tips about newbie books that is about 3D theory and math, and gives the reader a good insight in the topic. Im considering at the moment "Computer Graphics: principels and practice" or "3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development".

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I own "3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development" and everything math-related I've ever needed in 3D-programming can be found there. It's one of the best books I have, even though there are some "misprints" in it (they're listed on the books homepage).

It's mostly a reference book, good for when you need that Polygon-line-intersection-forumla explained again, nothing you read from front to back though.

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Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice is probably the most famous introductory book. It's excellent and mostly theory. It's not going to even mention OpenGL[1], but it does talk about some hardware architectures. Essentially, it talks about pretty much everything that involves funny little coloured dots on computer screens.

I quite like Geometric Tools for Computer Graphics (a quick look at the errata will tell you it has errors - I'd suggest a quick check of the errata before implementation.) It's also pretty maths heavy, it's also rather useful. It's not something that you read through though, it's intended, and works as, a reference. I'm not sure about it being a newbie book. I'd say it would depend primarily on your maths ability and knowledge.

I haven't read 3D Math Primer.

You seem to be considering buying one of two very different books. CG: P&P is a book which is very much 'there an algorithm for v called w, it's good for x, it's bad for y, it works like z'. It covers most of the classic algorithms and I consider it a fascinating read. It's not a very mathematical book although it has some.

If you want to know about computer graphics, I doubt you can go far wrong with CG: P&P. If you want math, although it has some, I don't think it's really the book to get.

As you've probably realised, there isn't a single book that covers everything. Choose what you want to read about next, get that book. Find a good academic bookshop and read the book before you buy.

[1] It's never heard of Microsoft either.

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Geometric Tools for Computer Graphics is deffinately not a newbie book for someone looking to learn 3D maths theory. Great book though, but better to leave it until you are more confident.

Imo the best theory book is Real Time Rendering though Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice is good too.

3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development is alittle more tutorial style (or atleast it felt that way to me) than what you might be looking for, but it depends on your learning style.

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About the "principles and practice" book: i was on amazon.com and noticed that there where several books with similar names from the same author. Two were called "Computer Graphics Principles and Practice" One was released in 1990, and the other was to be released in 2006. The third was called "computer graphics principles and practice in C". Which one of these books are the book you people are referring to? do they all contain the same stuff?

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