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important things to cover about visual studio

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My professor for "Intro to Modern IDE" which is a class detailing Visual Studio Net is a bit unexposed to the subject matter and is learning the material as she teaches. Since I have had some experience with it working on my various game projects she has asked if I could be an advisor for the class. Right now, I am trying to figure out what exactly the class should cover. My understanding of visual studio is basically creating various projects in console/win32 c++, visual basic, java, and c#. I was thinking I could dabble a bit in all of these languages and also introduce some windows API when working with win32 c++ projects. However I have never used the Microsoft Foundation Classes as I found the API much easier, I also have not used any wizards to create windows and forms in visual c++. Do you think any of this material is necessary, and also I was wondering what would be considered absolutely critical to cover.

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Since the title of the course points towards using the IDE, I would recommend covering things life form design in c# / vb, the resource editors in c++, how to fudge around with editor settings such as colors and toolbars, and all the different settings in project properties and such. I don't think that you should concentrate too much on programming, only use programming to show how a feature of the IDE works.

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My opinion of some stuff you should cover:

* How to link to libraries.
* How to specify different directories for TOOLS / INCLUDE / LIB, etc.
* Show them how to use the MSDN documentation.
* Show them such features as code completion, intellisense, etc.
* Difference between DEBUG and RELEASE modes
* How to use the Class Wizard
* Using the resource editor (and using such resources .. ALA
MAKEINTRESOURCE() and whatnot).
* Show them how to add files to a project and which files go where (ie, source, headers, resources into their respective folders) along with where they end up on the actual drive.
* Show them where their EXE's end up by default (under DEBUG/RELEASE)
* Show them how to DEBUG their code and use breakpoints & stepping through/over code
* Difference between some of the different Wizards and what they do
* How they can customize the IDE and editor to their liking

Well, that's just some ideas...

-Greg

--
PS: I use 6.0, so some of this may be different for .NET

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I have to side with morx here, except for the debugging-parts. Don't go into how to actually debug code, just show them there are buttons and hotkeys for the various things you can do in a debugger, and what they do. Teaching debugging is an advanced subject, and doesn't belong in a class on IDE´s.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
WOAH THERE! The debugger is just about the best feature of Visual Studio, if you're covering just one IDE then spend a couple of lessons showing people how to step through a sample program (which you'll have to write).

I spend all day staring at debug output (it's my job) and fixing bugs. Well worth spending a little time over as not enough people know how to use to find even the most basic of problems.

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I'm with morx on this. I had one hell of a time understanding how to work with the IDE project files and what not. My prof. required of us that we put our projects on floppy disk and can you imagine what mess that was for me? I still have nightmares about that :)

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