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Acoustica

What's in a name?

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Acoustica    992
I've always been facinated with language, and in particular, names. There's just something exciting about knowing that your name means more than just, well, you. [smile] I think it would be really cool to know where your real name comes from. If you need help finding an origin for your name, Behind the Name is a great place to start to find at least a basic origin. So let's get started! - Tyler - English - From an occupational surname meaning "tiler of roofs" in Old English.

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_the_phantom_    11250
Robert
- English, French, Scandinavian
- "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It belonged to three kings of Scotland, including Robert the Bruce who restored the independence of Scotland from England in the 14th century. The author Robert Browning and poets Robert Burns and Robert Frost are famous literary bearers of this name. Also, Robert E. Lee was the commander of the Confederate army during the American Civil War.

and I'm working on living up to my name [grin]

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Samith    2460
SAM m,f
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAM
Short form of SAMSON, SAMUEL, or SAMANTHA. This is also the name of a hobbit in J. R. R. Tolkien's novel 'The Lord of the Rings'. His full first name was Samwise meaning "half wise" in Old English (the language used by Tolkien to represent the hobbit speech).

(not my name, my birth certificate just says "Sam Johnston", but this is techinically part of my name (more like my name is part of this))
SAMUEL m
Usage: English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Biblical
Pronounced: SAM-yoo-el, SAM-yool
From the Hebrew name Shemu'el which could mean either "name of God" or "God has heard". Samuel was the last of the ruling judges in the Old Testament. He anointed Saul to be the first king of Israel, and later anointed David.

SAMSON m
Usage: Biblical, English
Pronounced: SAM-sun
From the Hebrew name Shimshon which probably meant "sun". Samson was an Old Testament hero of exceptional strength. His uncut hair was the source of his power, but his mistress Delilah betrayed him and cut it. Thus he was captured by the Philistines, blinded, and brought to their temple. However, in a final act of strength, he pulled down the pillars of the temple upon himself and his captors.

I want to be Samson!

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TravelingCoder    296
JOSHUA m
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAH-shu-wa, JAW-shwa
From the Hebrew name Yehoshua which meant "YAHWEH is salvation". Joshua was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan by Moses in the Old Testament. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites. The name Jesus was a variant of the name Joshua.

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Radan    404
Wow, what a surprise, my name aint there. On the other hand I never heard anybody else had the same name as me! I kinda like it that way

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bastard2k5    238
Quote:

DOUGLAS m
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: DUG-lus
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghlas, which meant "dark river" or "blood river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river". Douglas was originally a river name, the site of a particularly bloody battle, which then became a Scottish surname. The surname belonged to a powerful line of Scottish earls.

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23yrold3yrold    941
Quote:
CHRISTOPHER m
Usage: English
Pronounced: KRIS-to-fur
Means "bearing Christ", derived from Late Greek Christos combined with pherein "to bear, to carry". Christopher was the legendary saint who carried the young Jesus across a river. He is the patron saint of travellers. Another famous bearer was Christopher Columbus, the explorer who reached the West Indies in the 15th century.

Already knew that. [smile] Also already knew it was insanely popular. I know too many Chris's. [rolleyes]

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USArmyMortars    187
PATRICK m
Usage: Irish, English, French, German

Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), pat-REEK (French)

From the Roman name Patricius, which meant "nobleman" in Latin. A 5th-century saint, the patron saint of Ireland, adopted this name (his birth name was Sucat). During his youth he was captured by Irish raiders and enslaved, but after six years of servitude he escaped to his home in Britain. Eventually he became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary, where he succeeded in Christianizing the entire country.

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Ra    1062
Quote:
ANTHONY m
Usage: English

From the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. It is sometimes claimed to mean "flower" from Greek anthos. <-- NO!! Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius) was the Roman general who ruled the Roman empire jointly with Augustus for a short time. Their relationship turned sour however, and he and his mistress Cleopatra (hell yes) were attacked and forced to commit suicide. <-- crap! Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' is based on them. Other famous bearers include the 3rd-century Saint Anthony the Abbot, a hermit from Egypt who founded monasticism, and the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal.

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jmutch    397
Quote:
Original post by TravelingCoder
JOSHUA m
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: JAH-shu-wa, JAW-shwa
From the Hebrew name Yehoshua which meant "YAHWEH is salvation". Joshua was one of the twelve spies sent into Canaan by Moses in the Old Testament. After Moses died Joshua succeeded him as leader of the Israelites. The name Jesus was a variant of the name Joshua.


same here

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aidan_walsh    739
Quote:
AIDAN m,f
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: AY-den
Anglicized form of AODHÁN, occasionally used as a feminine name.

AODHÁN m
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pet form of AODH. This was the name of an Irish monk and saint of the 7th century.

AODH m
Usage: Irish, Scottish
Pronounced: EE, AY
From the old Irish name Aed, which meant "fire". This was the name of several Irish kings.

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Xtremehobo    820
MATTHEW m
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: MATH-yoo
English form of Matthaios, which was a Greek form of the Hebrew name Mattithyahu which meant "gift of YAHWEH". Saint Matthew, also called Levi, was one of the twelve apostles (a tax collector). He was supposedly the author of the first Gospel in the New Testament.

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Mushu    1396
Quote:
CAMPBELL m
Usage: Scottish
Pronounced: KAM-bul
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked mouth" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and béul "mouth". The Campbells were one of the great Highland clans.

On a further historical note, we later betrayed the most powerful clan, the MacDonalds to the English, so that our clan could become the most powerful clan in all of Scotland!

...How were we supposed to know that MacDonalds hamburgers would become so widespread? Just another historical oops... [wink]

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Rickwi22    212
I dont know if this has anything to do with the origins of the name, but a few days ago a friend and I realized that every Jeff we know is a skinny white asshole. His name is Jeff by the way hehe.

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I Like Bread    630
Quote:
BRENDAN m
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BREN-dan
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot. According to legend he and 17 other monks crossed the Atlantic and reached North America.

Columbus and Vaspucci can SUCK IT.

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Q-Parser    168
JOZEF m
Usage: Slovak, Slovene, Polish, Dutch
Slovak, Slovene, Polish and Dutch form of JOSEPH

JOSEPH m
Usage: English, French, Biblical
Pronounced: JO-sef (English), zho-ZEF (French)
From the Latin Josephus, which was from the Greek Iosephos, which was from the Hebrew name Yoseph meaning "he will add". In the Old Testament Joseph was the eleventh son of Jacob. Because he was the favourite of his father, his older brothers sent him to Egypt and told their father that he had died. In Egypt, Joseph became an advisor to the pharaoh, and was eventually reconciled with his brothers when they came to Egypt during a famine. This is the name of two characters in the New Testament: Joseph the husband of Mary and Joseph of Arimathea. Also, rulers of the Holy Roman Empire have had this name.

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lethalhamster    156
NICHOLAS m
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: NI-ko-las (English), nee-ko-LA (French)
From the Greek name Nikolaos which meant "victory of the people" from Greek nike "victory" and laos "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is also known as Santa Claus (from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, and Greece and Russia. Nicholas was also the name of two czars of Russia and five popes.

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Useless Hacker    372
Quote:
MICHAEL m
Usage: English, German, Czech, Biblical
Pronounced: MIE-kul
From the Hebrew name Miyka'el which meant "who is like God?". This was the name of one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers. This was also the name of nine Byzantine emperors and a czar of Russia. Other more modern bearers of this name include the 19th-century chemist/physicist Michael Faraday and basketball player Michael Jordan.

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ArchWizard    1083
Man, ArchWizard wasn't in there, although they said that Argus is similar. Here's my real name:

Quote:
PAUL
Usage: English, French, German, Romanian, Biblical

From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Saint Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church, his story told in Acts in the New Testament. He was originally named Saul, but changed his name after converting to Christianity. Most of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him. This was also the name of six popes. Famous bearers of this name in the art world include Paul Cezanne and Paul Gauguin, both 19th-century impressionist painters from France.


Lame!

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Hedos    674
PHILIPPE m
Usage: French
Pronounced: fee-LEEP
French form of PHILIP

No description for the french form, so here is the description of 'PHILIPPE':

From the Greek name Philippos which means "friend of horses", composed of the elements philos "friend" and hippos "horse". Saint Philip was an apostle in the New Testament. This was also the name of an early figure in the Christian church spoken of in Acts in the New Testament. The name was borne by five kings of Spain, six kings of France, and five kings of Macedon, including Philip II the father of Alexander the Great.

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ArchWizard    1083
I decided to play around a little bit.

The shortened version of ArchWizard:
Quote:

ARCHIE
Usage: Scottish, English
Pet form of ARCHIBALD


Which leads to:

Quote:

ARCHIBALD
Usage: Scottish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold".

Lies, I am not bold. Well, maybe I'm a little bold on teh intarweb.

Final Fantasy fans should get this one:

Quote:
EDGAR
Usage: English, French
Derived from the Old English element ead "rich, blessed" combined with gar "spear".

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xlotl    288
Quote:
ANDREW m
Usage: English, Biblical
Pronounced: AN-droo
From the Greek name Andreas, which derives from aner "man" (genitive andros "of a man"). In the New Testament the apostle Andrew was the brother of the apostle Simon Peter. According to legend he was crucified on an X-shaped cross, and he is the patron saint of Scotland, Russia, and Greece. This was also the name of kings of Hungary.


Quote:
Origin: Biblical
Meaning: A strong man

Origin: English
Meaning: Manly; brave. In the bible the first of the twelve apostles chosen. Andrew is patron saint of Scotland and Russia. See also Jedrick and Kendrick.

Origin: Greek
Meaning: Manly. St Andrew, an apostle of Jesus Christ, later became patron saint of Scotland. The Scottish city St Andrews is named for him. It was in frequent use throughout Britain during the Middle Ages.

Origin: Scottish
Meaning: Manly. From the Greek Andrew. Has long been a popular Scottish name, because St. Andrew is the Patron Saint of Scotland after whom the town of St Andrews was named.


It's a fairly popular name but I only seem to find Andrew's in clusters. A lot of places don't have any Andrew's but as soon as I meet one I will meet four others.

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Densun    691
MARKO m
Usage: Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Finnish
Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian and Finnish form of MARK

MARK m
Usage: English, Russian, Biblical
Familiar form of MARCUS. Saint Mark was the author of the second Gospel in the New Testament. He is the patron saint of Venice, where he is supposedly buried. Another famous bearer of this name was Mark Antony (Marcus Antonius), the Roman triumvir who was the lover of Cleopatra. Shakespeare tells this story in his tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra'. Yet another famous bearer was the American author Mark Twain, real name Samuel Clemens, author of 'Tom Sawyer' and 'Huckleberry Finn'.

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Cold_Steel    835
Oh man, I got screwed:


Quote:
COREY m
Usage: English
Pronounced: KOR-ee
From a surname which was possibly either derived from the Old Norse given name Kori (of unknown meaning), or else meant "ravine" in Gaelic.


Ravine? WTF? At least the fact that it may have come from old Norse is cool. Ooooh, Kori, unknown meaning. Let's just pretend it meant something like, "Ruler of the world" or "Destroyer of men". You know, something cool.

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