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Red Planet

I need Visual C++ 6.0 Professional

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Hi all! I like to buy a Visual C++ 6.0 Professional edition. It must be legal with license (not AE or any restrictions) and original CDs required. Anyone can help me? If yes, please reply or email at: red_planet@freemail.hu Thaks boys!

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Yeah. But i haven't seen 6.0, just one - i've bidded and won, sent the money and the product didn't arrived to me...[imwithstupid]
So if anyone have this old ver (may be somebody upgraded) i'm the possible people who would like to buy it.[rolleyes]

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Um, eBay has a protection policy for situations like that. You should file a claim and get your money back, if you indeed never got your product. However, if the seller shipped it and it simply didn't arrive, I don't know if that falls under the shipping insurance policy or not.

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While I'm not too fond of the C# java-like syntax from what I've seen, I am pleased that you can still make pure C++ applications with it. So yeah, get C# if you can, because then you won't have to upgrade anytime soon after, and also you won't run into any of the older bugs found in VC++ 6.

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I have many apps written in Visual C++ 6.0 and i like to continue these but i afraid about .NET :
1. Have framework installed on machines to run my app (as i heard)
2. Need DirectX SDK and i don't know how fits .NET (although i now use Visual Studio 6.0 Enterprise edition (khmm, a "trial" version [embarrass]) and i suppose the Visual C++ 6.0 Professional gives me same dev environment).

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Quote:
Original post by Red Planet
I have many apps written in Visual C++ 6.0 and i like to continue these but i afraid about .NET :
1. Have framework installed on machines to run my app (as i heard)
2. Need DirectX SDK and i don't know how fits .NET (although i now use Visual Studio 6.0 Enterprise edition (khmm, a "trial" version [embarrass]) and i suppose the Visual C++ 6.0 Professional gives me same dev environment).

You can open your projects in Visual Studio .NET, and you can run them without the .NET framework installed - as long as you produce native executables (easy - open the existing projects. And for new projects, just ignore the .NET project types)

The DirectX SDK also works fine with VS.NET, and you'll actually get access to the shader debugger (which isn't available under 6.0)

Put nicely: Get VS.NET, pleaaaaaase [smile]

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Thx for the replies!

You're about to convince about .NET of me...
Is exist a Professional version of Visual C++.NET ?
Because i like to make a commercial ver. programs, and i heard about standard - which is not allowed this.

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I don't know if the pro version is even available unless you buy the whole studio. That could get pricey. I would instead buy the vc++ 2003 standard edition. It doesn't come with optimizing compiler but you probably won't need it. You can sell your apps no problem.

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I asked MS, and they're told me:
1. Visual C++.NET Standard is about ~150 USD but i can't make commercial programs
2. Visual C++.NET Professional not sold separately, just part of Visual Studio (as JD said). It's about ~1000 USD.
3. Standard with Toolkit: same like point 1., because _all_ standard version developer kits are valid for hobby programmers and learning.
So i have two ways to make commercial progz:
Visual Studio.NET or old Visual C++ 6.0 Professional.
If i am not mistaken.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Since MS told me that :)
I have asked about three independent source, the answer was same and depressing.

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You made me paranoid to check my EULA/License on C++ .NET 2003 standard and I could find no such clause anywhere on it.

Sounds like a FUD tactic to get you bumped up to Studio .NET.

Now, Academic version has this restriction and I've heard that the 2005 Express version might also, but this is unconfirmed.

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[uncalled for open-source advocacy]
Start developing with gcc and dev-c++ or emacs, and you won't have to spend a dime or worry about ridiculous licences. Plus you get nerd-points if you can actually figure out how to use gdb and other cryptic tools.
[/uncalled for]

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Quote:
Original post by jgoewert
You made me paranoid to check my EULA/License on C++ .NET 2003 standard and I could find no such clause anywhere on it.

Sounds like a FUD tactic to get you bumped up to Studio .NET.

Now, Academic version has this restriction and I've heard that the 2005 Express version might also, but this is unconfirmed.


First, I have standard, and you are correct - there is no restriction for creating commerical programs. Also, everything I've read suggests that Academic is exactly the same as Pro - So, it has the optimizing compiler and it's executables are able to be distributed.

Here is a link on the academic version from a MS rep.
Should I buy VS.Net Academic?

You may be confusing this restriction with the Introductory version that ships with many books.
Also, one other distiction that many people fail to notice is that of the MSDNAA licence vs the Academic licensing. MSDNAA is a school licence, so the individual student doesn't have the licensing rights. This is not the case with the normal store bought Academic version, where the user has all of the rights, and it is valid after your schooling is over.

Here is a good thread that covers a lot of the licensing issues.
Academic vs Retail vs. OEM

[Edited by - shane1985 on September 8, 2004 2:39:43 PM]

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Is it truth?
I don't want to belive to MS wants to bang me! If you can may i ask you to scan .NET Standard EULA and put up somwhere?
I wrote to MS just now to describe me about this situation and if they're reply i will quote it.

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visual c++ 6 has a few annoying things, one of them is you cant do this:

for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
{
}

for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
{
}

it will return a redefinition error.

I now use MinGW Studios, took me a bit to get use to no intellisense,but now its fine

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Quote:
Original post by bakery2k1
Or just

#define for if(1)for

oh really? so what does

if(something)
for(...) {}
else
something else...

end up doing?
well, lets expand our little macro

if(something)
if(1)
for(...) {}
else
something else...

hrm...that doesn't look right does it? The moral of the story: there is usually a reason why we do silly things like:

#define for if(0); else for

Atleast for horribly ancient compilers like VC++6.

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Quote:
Original post by Coder
Quote:
Original post by johnnyBravo
visual c++ 6 has a few annoying things, one of them is you cant do this:

for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
{
}

for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
{
}

it will return a redefinition error.

As a workaround, you can do this:
#define for if(0); else for

which fixes the issue.


a better work around is to enclose the whole loop in braces, making the loop a local scope as it should be.

{for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
{
...
}}

{for(int i=0;i<4;i++)
{
...
}}

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Quote:
Original post by Red Planet
Is it truth?
I don't want to belive to MS wants to bang me! If you can may i ask you to scan .NET Standard EULA and put up somwhere?
I wrote to MS just now to describe me about this situation and if they're reply i will quote it.
Not scanned, but this is the EULA of VS 7 Academic(copied from the VS7 directory) : Here

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