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Background/Deamon in Mobile?

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Is it possible to create a mobile application that works like a deamon or a background process.. What im trying to say is the application is still running even if the window being displayed or currently in focus is not YOUR application window... Meaning that the application continue to run even the phones keypad is locked(the cell phone is not in used[or the current window is the desktop window]).. Is any one of you got any idea on how to do this? (on any platform).. thanks

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On multi-tasking OSs such as Symbian (Series 60) your app can go out of focus (via hideNotify()) and run in the background. It will continue to run & consume the devices resources (i.e. heap) even though it is not the primary Canvas.
In MIDP 2.0, Java MIDlets have the ability to be spawned by other processes, as far as I know. This is not possible in MIDP 1.0.



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To clarify that: Nokia Series 60 phones will automatically put your MIDlet in the background (and call the hideNotify() callback in the Canvas you're displaying) when the user hits the 'end call' or 'application menu' keys.

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If you are prepared to do this in C++ you can do this no problem for Symbian OS. Though obviously keep in mind running down the battery etc!

MIDP2 you can add entries to the registry so certain events will trigger your midp to run such as an sms arriving! Though i dont know if you can leave your MIDlet running in the background processing away!

Brian

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Quote:
Original post by Zahlman
To clarify that: Nokia Series 60 phones will automatically put your MIDlet in the background (and call the hideNotify() callback in the Canvas you're displaying) when the user hits the 'end call' or 'application menu' keys.
It's not just that. Your app can call notifyPaused() to tell the phone to stick it in the background. Later, it can call resumeRequest() and come back up.

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