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Game script layout

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I'm currently writing a script for a project I am working on. However, I am not quite sure how a script should be laid out for a game... Does it follow the same pattern as a screenplay? Here is an example of my layout: THE CHARACTER (Whilst doing something): Speaks his dialogue here. And then performs a stage direction, whilst asking ANOTHER CHARACTER a question. ANOTHER CHARACTER: Responds. Is this correct?

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I don't believe there is a standard script format for games. I suppose it depends on whether you're writing a linear scene or a branching dialogue puzzle. For the former a movie or comic book script/storyboard format should work fine, but for the latter a flowchart or choose-your-own-adventure paragraph numbering is necessary.

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If you're writing the script for an animated cutscene, then, yes, use standard screenplay format. It's much easier on the voice actors and the animators.

If you're writing in-game dialog then you're on your own. There currently is no standard format.

I've found it useful in the past to keep in-game dialog in an Excell spreadsheet. In-game sound clips tend to be short so they usually fit fine into a spreadsheet column, and it lets you the keep tracking and triggering information right with the dialog. If you've got hundreds of little snippets of dialog, it really pays off to establish a tracking system and be methodical about keeping on top of it. This will pay added dividends when you need to localize, as you have something that's tidy and well-organized that you can pass off to whoever is handling the translation.

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Most of the game design books I have read have either their own specific format they made just for the game, or they just changed one they found to their own ends.

My advice it to realize you are writing scenes, and that means pace, action and dialogue are and/or required, and that means the master author's screenplay format ought to be written in, because the reason that format was designed was to give you complete control over pace/action, cuts and speech.

Adventuredesign

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How about scripted in-game dialogue? For instance, two NPCs talking to each other.

Does anyone know where I can find a document on screenplay format?

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Quote:
Original post by golar
How about scripted in-game dialogue? For instance, two NPCs talking to each other.

Does anyone know where I can find a document on screenplay format?


Google "screenplay format" and you'll find lots of links.

For scripted in-game dialog it depends on how the exchange is presented to the player. If you can be more specific on what you're trying to do, I can offer some suggestions.

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Quote:
Original post by golar
How about scripted in-game dialogue? For instance, two NPCs talking to each other.

Does anyone know where I can find a document on screenplay format?


Google "screenplay format" and you'll find lots of links.

For scripted in-game dialog it depends on how the exchange is presented to the player. If you can be more specific on what you're trying to do, I can offer some suggestions.

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This topic is 4839 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

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