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Super Beginner with some needed help-THERMODYNAMICS i'm right here

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hey, i just need to know the first and most basic thing a noobster like me can do to get started, just to let you know i do not know any languages. i have almost NO knowledge of game making so please tell me the VERY first thing i should do thanks the noobster;)

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Guest Anonymous Poster
The first thing you need is a good background in math, after that you should learn a simple language like visual basic or blitzbasic

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Start here

But you've come to the right place for game development! First you have to choose a language. Once you become adept at that language, choose a graphics API. Then get cracking. But expect this whole process to take between 3~18 months, depending on what language you choose...


Mushu - trying to help those he doesn't know, with things he doesn't know.
Why won't he just go away? An question the universe may never have an answer to...

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I hope you enjoy reading, because that is my advice. You can find plenty of help on this site alone. When you add to that Google and Amazon, you have quite an impressive amount of disscussion on the topic.

Everywhere you will read the same thing- start small.

Pick a language to begin with. There are a multitude out there and they all have their pros and cons. I started back in the day with BASIC. I also programmed a bit on my calculator.

I would suggest starting with something simple like one of those languages. (If you learn how to program well in one language, learning more isn't that difficult). Many people will probably tell you to learn C++. As powerful as the language is, I don't think it is the best for beginners. If you have a graphics calculator, start with that. Try Visual Basic is you want to program on your computer instead.

If you want to, work with the macros that are created by word and excel. (these are actually a slightly modified Visual Basic). If you want to try more graphical stuff look into programming flash (I honestly have not read anything on this so I don't know how hard it is to learn.)

But over all- I have 3 rules that I have always followed.

1. Read.
2. Keep it simply
3. Just try it out and see if it works.


BTW- I still think your name is hilarious. :)

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ok, thanks a lot thermo,
so are you sure that there is nothing easier than VB6?
im not trying to be annoying or anythinbut like you said, im trying ot keep it as simple as it can be,
BTW, how do you program with a calculator?
thanks
the noobster

lol

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It all depends on what you want to do. If you want pretty pictures that move around, use VB. If you would rather have a text window that says
Quote:
Computer: You see a flask on the table.
User: Get Flask
Computer: You cannot get the flask. It's stuck.
User: Get Flask
Computer: I said you can't get it because it's stuck. Sheesh, you would think people would read before they type in stupid commands
User: Get Flask
Computer: You finally manage to get the flask. Unfortunately, it was a load bearing flask because the whole dungeon collapses on you. Are you happy now?


If all you want is text, there are easier programs. Check out some of the links already posted here. I am sure they can help you more than me.

Above all, have fun. I look forward to your tetris clone.

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And, just for reference, VB6 works fine with graphical APIs, like DirectX (not sure about OGL, though), which means you can use it for slightly more complicated stuff as well too.

The main problem with VB6 is that it is not a mainstream programming language - that is, it's fine for hobbiest work, but when it comes to professional stuff, most of that is done in C++.

But I'd have to say that VB6 is immensely easier to start learning than C++, especially if you have no previous experience with programming.


Mushu - VB6 and Dx8.1 hobbiest who posts while he codes.
Why won't he just go away? An question the universe may never have an answer to...

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All of the replies are good. The languages mentioned will all give you a concept of programming but no matter what you use, you will have to learn the language. So if you start with VB and decide to go to C++, the time spent on VB is relatively usless to you. What I would suggest is first, figure out what it is you would like to do with your programming. Where to you want to end up? Making games to sell, getting in the industry, or hobyist? Once you know that, find out what the majority are using and get some books. The only reason I say to find out what the majority are using is because there is likely to be more help when you need it.

Once you get the books, start reading everything you can about the language you select and PROGRAM!!! Program everything you can. Make programs to calculate the temperature, that guess numbers, that choose colors, that do anything else you can imagine. Reading is fine but the excercises are what you are going to learn from. Good luck.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by Grellin
So if you start with VB and decide to go to C++, the time spent on VB is relatively usless to you.


That's mayor bollocks. Time spent programming is never useless. Once your good at programming, switching languages is easy. Altough switching from VB to C++ is a big jump it is far easier than actualy understanding some basic programming concepts (and under basic I consider stuff like Dijkstra or inheritance).

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Quote:
Original post by Grellin
So if you start with VB and decide to go to C++, the time spent on VB is relatively usless to you.
That is as inane as saying learning addition is useless when you want to learn geometry.

Yes the sematics are different. The structure is different.
But the logical process used to program is the same in any language. The biggest difference is OOP vs procedural. Learning a simpler language is useful in that it is closer to English. Instead of jumping to the second floor it is easier taking the stairs.

EDIT: Apparently the AP beat me to the punch.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
hey, im noobster again except im not logged in.
anyway i really dont know, im gonna start with blitz basic.
what should i do after blitz basic?
BTW, does the text option give me the option of actually playing it WITH the graphics?
or to actually see my game in progress do i have to do the graphics option,
and either way dont i have to know some language?
thanks
the noobster

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Quote:
Original post by Thermodynamics
Quote:
Original post by Grellin
So if you start with VB and decide to go to C++, the time spent on VB is relatively usless to you.
That is as inane as saying learning addition is useless when you want to learn geometry.


If you and the AP had read the line before the one you jumped all over you would have read that I did say it would give you a concept of programming. What I said is absolutely correct. I don't know a line of VB nor do I care to learn it and I get along just fine in C++. I didn't say that one language was either useless or better than another. I simply stated that if you are going to learn one language, learning an easier language that has very few if any similarities to the one you want to end up with is a waste of time for where he is at in his coding. If he decides he is going to pursue his coding past the hobby/trial stage he can go to a University and learn all of them.



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Guest Anonymous Poster
noobster again, not logged in.
i basically want to be a hobbyist with as good programming skills as a person who just started to do programming as an occupancy.

i want to be a one-man programmer meaning that eventually i hope i can be good at graphics and text.

i will start with blitz basic because as i said im really novice!
i'm also probably too young and unexperienced to do c/c++

BTW, is C any easier than C++

the noobster

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C/C++ is not that hard if you have a good book like Deitel's C++ How to Program. Even if you are the dumbiest noob, the book starts in the very beginning of programming. Do not fear C/C++, these languages are complex, yes, but if you take one step at a time, you will be fine.

Knowing C++, it will be easier to learn java, for example. So, if you start through C++, you can pick other languages easier - that's my opinion.

I started to learn programming i university, through C, then we moved to OOP with C++ and Java. We had a slow pace, and eventually, I learned the lessons. I never tried programming before, just had a slight idea of what an algorithm was. Now, it's been only three years of programming, but I managed to code many softwares and the basic game clones - currently working in a java clone of Final Fantasy Tactics.

No matter what path you take, remember to READ a lot and PRACTICE - nothing will be attained without that.

Good luck ; )

Forgive my poor english...

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Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
noobster again, not logged in.
i basically want to be a hobbyist with as good programming skills as a person who just started to do programming as an occupancy.

i want to be a one-man programmer meaning that eventually i hope i can be good at graphics and text.
Just like anything else, it will take a while to learn it as well as a professional.

Quote:
i will start with blitz basic because as i said im really novice!
Good! I am glad you picked out a language.
Quote:

i'm also probably too young and unexperienced to do c/c++

There was a recent thread in the lounge about what age people started programming at. I started on Basic at 7 or 8. Unless you are still having trouble reading, you are never to young to start coding.
Quote:

BTW, is C any easier than C++
Careful!! Questions like that have been know to start epic wars on these forums. It is all a matter of preference. You might as well ask if Italian is easier than French. Any language that you pick will be difficult when you first try it. However, if you know one language, learning the next is much easier, and generally faster.

Good luck!

Oh yea.... It is really strange seeing my name in a title. Kinda cool though.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
noobster again, not logged in.
ok thanks thermo,
but can you tell a little about blitz basic 2d?
ok, yea, i get the concept but still, im sure blitz basic is easier then c/c++,
BTW, whats the difference between the two c's.

well, thanks thermo, you have been the nicest person here so far.
but i think the only reason you found me was because of my name....lol

the noobster;)

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I have never heard of blitz basic before so I can't help you out there. I would suggest googling it and reading up on it there.

I am also not well versed with C, although I have programmed in C++ (a while ago). As far as I know (I could be wrong), C was designed originally as a procedeural language, then later C++ was designed to be C as an object oriented language. If you would like to learn one of the two, I would suggest C++ simply because it caters to OOP.

Since you have said you are very new to programming, you are probably wondering what procedeural and OOP is. Basically-
Procedeural- a program designed by stepping through how the computer will execute the program. Example:
a=1
b=2
c=a+b
print c
This method works well for smaller programs.

OOP breaks the program up into pieces so parts of programs can be recycled or updated. It groups the program so that changing one aspect will have minimal impact on the rest. Example
Class Car
top=3
front=7
color=red
end class

call movecar (car)

Classes is one of the main ways that the program is grouped. In the example class car held all of the information about car that was needed. If I wanted to change something about the sidewalk, class car would in no way be affected.


This is probably just confusing you. I am not the best one to be teaching this as I barely have a decent grip on it myself. Again, it is time to read.

People on the boards are generally nicer if they realize that you have already researched the topic. If the first question you ask is something akin to "what is the boiling point of water?" people will ignore you or flame you. If you instead ask "How do I find the amount of salt required to make water melt at 5 degress C?" you will probably get a better response.

Now, I know in school they say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. Here there is. Always read before you post.

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Quote:

Yes the sematics are different. The structure is different.
But the logical process used to program is the same in any language. The biggest difference is OOP vs procedural.


since this was said in reference to VB, I'll just point out that you CAN program OOP in VB, it's just not as suited to it as other languages.

And for the OP, if you're considering VB, Lucky's VB gaming tutorials are a good resource, as is DirectX4VB.

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hey,does anyone here know about blitz basic/ its pros & cons,
i just got it today and programmed VERY basic things text-based like where i type in my name then it sais HI, then my name.
i know thats retarded but hey, im taking it one step at a time

the noobster:p

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'Hello user' may seem to be a stupid program, but it's quite often one of the first programs many people learn, and it does make a good intro to the language of choice. Make sure you continue to do little exercises like that, make sure you understand everything they intend you to understand. To further your learning and understanding from such excersises, it's a good idea to play around with changing the code and seeing what happens, or perhaps trying to do something slightly different. From what you've learnt from a Hello User program for example, you could probably create your own 'A+B=C' program.

(If you want to try that:
-take input for A
-take input for B
-add A and B together
-display result)

Anyways, my point is that very basic programs such as this, although they seem quite silly, actually make a good foundation for your learning.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Here's my opinion.You should start with basic4gl.It's a free compiler and virtual machine.You'll learn how to program AND how to use opengl without bothering with all the complicateed stuff that surround the other languages.It's perfect for beginers.

Go here for the download:http://basic4gl.net/

Here for the tutorials:http://basic4gl.net/tutorials.htm

And here's a forum where you can get help:http://basic4gl.proboards20.com/

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