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is real time ray-tracing patented? (i mean the fast way)

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ok for the really dumb question now, I have been thinking about some new way to do real time ray-tracing (I mean fast) and I just came up with some interesting idea but then I found in this forum archives that it had been done long ago but is patented. namely: patent #4,897,806, patent #5,025,400, patent #5,239,624 could anyone comment on that and explain me in plain english what these patents are about.

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Links:

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=/netahtml/srchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=4,897,806.WKU.&OS=PN/4,897,806&RS=PN/4,897,806

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=/netahtml/srchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=5,025,400.WKU.&OS=PN/5,025,400&RS=PN/5,025,400

http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=/netahtml/srchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=5,025,400.WKU.&OS=PN/5,025,400&RS=PN/5,239,624

Didn't read the contents yet, gonna do that now.

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BTW I don't see what Robert L. Cook's work has to do with realtime raytracing; he simply wrote a paper on stochastic sampling: "Stochastic Sampling in Computer Graphics".

This technique is quite widely used.

Perhaps you can elaborate on your idea?

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I don't see how this would result in very fast realtime raytracing. Stochastic sampling is used to sample multiple rays for a single pixel, to get anti-aliasing without interferention, or to calculate non-perfect reflections.

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Quote:
Original post by The Scytheman
I just recently submitted a U.S patent application for "a method for representing data as combinations of 1s and 0s."

-- Jani


Good. I'm pretty sure your patent is covered by at least one claim of mine : "method". Now, gimme da money please :)

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I wonder if Quasi-Random raytracing is patented the same way? =) And I wonder if the patent holds for Path Tracing, that was invented after Cook et al paper, and is much more general (but of course uses the same stochastic idea.)

>>Stochastic sampling is used to sample multiple rays for a
>>single pixel, to get anti-aliasing without interferention,
>>or to calculate non-perfect reflections.

Actually, stochastic ray sampling can simulate *any* effect... even full global illumination (of course, to get it fast, something more is needed than naive stochastic ray tracing.)

-- Mikko

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Quote:
Original post by Emmanuel Deloget
Good. I'm pretty sure your patent is covered by at least one claim of mine : "method". Now, gimme da money please :)


Ha! I own the patent for 'patenting'. How do you like that?! That means the U.S. patent office also owes me money. :)

-- Jani

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Quote:
Original post by uutee
I wonder if Quasi-Random raytracing is patented the same way? =) And I wonder if the patent holds for Path Tracing, that was invented after Cook et al paper, and is much more general (but of course uses the same stochastic idea.)

>>Stochastic sampling is used to sample multiple rays for a
>>single pixel, to get anti-aliasing without interferention,
>>or to calculate non-perfect reflections.

Actually, stochastic ray sampling can simulate *any* effect... even full global illumination (of course, to get it fast, something more is needed than naive stochastic ray tracing.)

-- Mikko


It seems that the patents have to do with distributed ray tracing by Cook et al. You can't possibly patent point sampling methods in general. There's just too much prior art. Well, I guess the U.S patent office is known for not being interested in checking these things out, so.. Anyway, sounds like a bs patent to me.

-- Jani

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