Sign in to follow this  
BradDaBug

Anything besides XMMS?

Recommended Posts

The more I use XMMS the more I realize it's junk. WinAmp can play just about anything you throw at it, but XMMS can't even figure out how to play files that don't have the right extension. This is Linux, right? Extensions optional? I don't suppose anyone knows of a different Winamp clone that works better, do they?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
GQMpeg is okay too. GQMpeg

I don't really know what your problem with XMMS is -- it plays just about everything. SHN, MP3, OGG, MOD, S3M, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Let me look into my crystal ball, you are a RedHat user?

Seriously, the canned distro's don't provide a "full" build of xmms; RedHat in particular doesn't include .mp3 support (out-of-the-box) due to patent/legal/royalty issues.

mplayer is another option, though it's designed to be a movie player it will play audio as well. I think xmms better for this though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
"Extensions optional" doesn't mean that programs can magically guess file types. It just means that the third to last character in the filename does not have to be a dot. So, to answer your question, yes, a lot of programs in Linux will still rely on the last couple characters of a filename to determine what it is, instead of looking at the first couple bytes of the file.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Xetrov
You can try Beep Media Player.


Wow, that's nice! The new GTK interface, at least. It still has the same file detection problems XMMS does. It just seems silly that it can't look at the first few bytes and go "hmmm, RIFF, why, this looks like a wav!"

I'll give the others a look too when I have more time. I'm using Debian, btw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Give JuK for KDE a try. It's a simple iTunes style interface which is very easy to use and is great for setting up playlists. I don't know if you agree, but I think Winamp/XMMS have terrible user interfaces. They've both got lots of tiny little buttons you can barely see or click and the playlist management is awful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have written my own music player, it's like Juk but with a IDEAl style UI (like KDevelop). I've kept it simple, just the features I needed (tag editor, playlist manager, monitors directories for new music files, a drag n drop playqueue so you can easily select what you wanna hear next without having to create a playlist for one occasion). All it needs is a decent icon (I'm no artist).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I like wxMusik, but rhythmbox/amarok are good for gnome/kde (muine would be good, but it uses mono, so it doesn't work to great if you use nptl)

Xmms is made a lot better by the mplayer plugin for it though (there are 2, one crashes all the time, one works)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can't believe juks been on my computer all this time and I only just realised, its the best media player I've ever used. The search feature being it's best part.

A visualization window and a random button (yes, I know it's in the menu) and it would be perfect.

btw, whats the MP3 library that all these apps use? Theres an annoying skipping "effect" in mine (in xmms and juk).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I always laugh when people talk about "extensions optional" in Linux as if it were a good thing. We're not talking about intelligent type-information encoded within the file as an alternative. Nope. Its more like "what if I was coding in C and all variables are handled with void*, and we just decided that Hungarian Notation was a bad idea".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by bobstevens
A flexible filesystem *is* a good thing. Renaming all your music to get rid of the extension... isn't.

And looking at the first few bytes of a file to determine the type is what we call "unreliable."


As opposed to looking at the last three characters of the name? =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by flukus
I can't believe juks been on my computer all this time and I only just realised, its the best media player I've ever used. The search feature being it's best part.

A visualization window and a random button (yes, I know it's in the menu) and it would be perfect.


I use Juk as well, it's simple and effective I find. Some good tips: set some shortcut keys for next/previous track etc. (you can use the new keyboard multimedia keys) from "Configure Shortcuts" and select the "Popup Track Announcement" option for a little system tray popup telling you what track your listening to when it starts.

Quote:

btw, whats the MP3 library that all these apps use? Theres an annoying skipping "effect" in mine (in xmms and juk).


This can be a common problem in some distros so you might want to check google. Normally, you have to set your sound playing thread to have a higher priority so the scheduler doesn't keeping stopping it and causing skips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by flukus
In the KDE control center it says the sound system is set to realtime priority but it was using open sound system, isn't ALSA the newer/better one?


I've got mine on auto detect and I don't get skipping. I'm not too sure what the difference between them all is. It's easy to switch system though so just go through them all and see if it helps. You could also try setting your buffer size a little larger from the same control panel (first tab). When does your music skip? If it does it during hard drive access, it might be because DMA access is not on (this allows transfering chunks of data from the drive without using the CPU). It could be a lot of other things too, such as the type of schedular your kernel is using. Try checking on google for "sound skipping <your distro name>" on the web and newsgroups and you should probably find lots of people with similar trouble to help you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:

File extensions are useful for people though

Taking the type information of a file out of the file name doesn't mean you won't be able to see it. Take the size of a file, in most file managers you can set it so that it's displayed underneath the name. Infact, many file managers already allow you to see what type a file is without looking at the extension by using different icons for different types of files.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by bytecoder
Taking the type information of a file out of the file name doesn't mean you won't be able to see it. Take the size of a file, in most file managers you can set it so that it's displayed underneath the name. Infact, many file managers already allow you to see what type a file is without looking at the extension by using different icons for different types of files.


My "file manager" doesn't do that though (it's called bash, btw ;-))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this