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TomX

Unsure about C++, Java and VB?

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Hi, Well I know this board gets an awful lot of "Which language" threads, but I kind of hope this one is different in a way, here my dilemma: I have started programming with Java and everything is fine but when I read articles like these: http://www.informit.com/articles/article.asp?p=30415&seqNum=2 ... I wonder if it's worth actually learning Java as it's described as second rate compared to C++. So here's my questions: 1. What limits does Java have that C++ doesn't and vice versa? 2. What limits does VB have that C++ doesn't have and vice versa? 3. What limits does VB have that Java doesn't and vice versa? 4. Most importantly, what is YOUR opinion on the future of these 3 programming languages in 8-10 years, give reasons please. Thanks in Advance Tom [Edited by - TomX on September 21, 2004 2:28:21 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Im sorry I dont have time right now to answer your questions, but I can say one thing: Disregard that article, the author appears to be grossly misinformed. I cannot emphasize that enough.

Quote:

Luckily for all involved, people are working on this problem, but don't hold your breath—they're working in VB and Java, so it might take a while.


This sentance makes me think the article is by someone having a laugh, except it isn't that funny. That or, perhaps, a bitter C++ developer who has been ousted from his job by a new generation of programmers who use Java/C#/VB to whip up useful applications in half the time he can do it.

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Quote:
Original post by TomX
4. Most importantly, what is YOUR opinion on the future of these 3 programming languages in 8-10 years, give reasons please.

I believe all 3 will probably be around for a while, although they will probably undergo minor or major transformations. If you're talking about them in the area of game development it's a no-brainer - C++ is the choice to make, although C# appears to be pretty useful and quite capable of making commercial quality games.

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Being a programer is never about a certain language. Java is a good way to start learning programming and OO, the switch to C++ should not be too difficult if it ever should be needed. The most important part about learning is getting into the way of thinking, how programs work and what possible solutions there are - if you can do this, then you'll be able to write code in any language.

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Quote:
Original post by TomX
So here's my questions:
1. What limits does Java have that C++ doesn't and vice versa?
2. What limits does VB have that C++ doesn't have and vice versa?
3. What limits does VB have that Java doesn't and vice versa?
4. Most importantly, what is YOUR opinion on the future of these 3 programming languages in 8-10 years, give reasons please.

Thanks in Advance
Tom


My answers:
1. java is slow, and c++ cant be used online like java (but you can create cgi files in c++)
2. vb? anything! vb was made in c++, vb uses a runtime, vb is for windows only
3. java is a multi-platform language, vb isn't.
4. vb is nice for beginners, not for next 8-10 years. i heard its not good for graphics programming. (by the way, the gui thing in vb, where you design your dialogs- is available in every visual studio program.)
java is nice for online programs, i dont think its best to be used for offline programs only.
c++ can be used forever, its an everlasting language. you dont have to worry about that language.
correct me if i wrong somewhere.

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Quote:
Original post by pex22
1. java is slow, and c++ cant be used online like java (but you can create cgi files in c++)
Java isn't slow. Plus, most contemporary JVM's use JIT compilation anyway.

Quote:
2. vb? anything! vb was made in c++, vb uses a runtime, vb is for windows only
VB hasn't required a runtime in several versions; it's been able to create standalone binaries since version 5, iirc. Oh, and there's REALbasic for the Mac, which is quite similar to VB. VB.NET is fully portable, however.

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3. java is a multi-platform language, vb isn't.
See last sentence above.

Quote:
4. vb is nice for beginners, not for next 8-10 years. i heard its not good for graphics programming. (by the way, the gui thing in vb, where you design your dialogs- is available in every visual studio program.)
VB wasn't targeted at beginners, it just has a shallow learning curve. It'll let you get away with a lot of poor code (well, not as much anymore with VB.NET), but learning to write efficient VB code takes a while. There's also a graphics engine written entirely in Visual Basic that is highly performant. I can't remember it's name or find a link right now.

Quote:
c++ can be used forever, its an everlasting language. you dont have to worry about that language.
Actually, you do. Just like assembly became an anachronism compared to C and C has been relegated in the minds of most to "low-level" programming like embedded systems and operating systems/device drivers, so, too, will C++ be usurped by something else. It's inevitable.

Quote:
correct me if i wrong somewhere.
Uh, everywhere?


What is important is to master the fundamental principles of programming, learning about enough different paradigms and approaches to problem solving as to have a portable skill set. As C++ is fairly multiparadigm, it's a good language to learn because it exposes you to a fair amount of variety, plus the sheer challenge of mastering it is a good recommendation to anyone who might be interested in hiring you.

So learn whatever languages suit your purposes. They are tools, nothing more.

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Quote:
Original post by grbrg
Being a programer is never about a certain language. Java is a good way to start learning programming and OO, the switch to C++ should not be too difficult if it ever should be needed.


Thats a good idea, I was having alot of trouble getting into c++ from using vb.

Then I learned java and c++ was easy after that.

I've never gone back to vb....

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Thanks for all the feedback :)

The author of that article must have been a bit bias.

I've decided to concentrate mainly until I'm pretty proficient with Java then when I feel the need I will learn C++ and possibly VB when I am proficient in C++.

Thanks Again
TomX

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I think you're going wrong way about this unless you want to learn OO. Prog. lang. is a tool and which one you use depends on the task at hand. You might use a scripting lang or something else. It all depends. I would like to see some techniques developed that could handle complex projects. Maybe FSM implemented into the prog. lang. I like to see code flow chart implemented into the IDE. How about IDE that pinpoints unreferenced functions for dead code elimination?

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