Sign in to follow this  
TomX

Is there a best OS for programming?

Recommended Posts

Hi, Well I'm planning to buy a computer, as I mentioned in a previous post. The problem I got now is deciding which OS is best for programming, I'm inclined to decide on a Windows platform, as it's combatible with VB, although I use Java mainly. What OS is best for Java development, or doesn't it matter? Thanks in Advance TomX [Edited by - TomX on September 21, 2004 2:28:05 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Thanks, what advantages does Linux have over Windows in relation to programming?


Better Editors and more techie oriented environment. Harder to crash it too if you do something dumb by mistake. That goes for any UNIX not just Linux

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Thanks, what advantages does Linux have over Windows in relation to programming?


I can't really think of anything, honestly. That said, I use Linux as a development environment. It's just what I'm familiar with, and I like the tools available. I don't necessarily feel that they're better than their MS counterparts. Use what you are comfortable with. If you think you might like an alternative toolset better, then try it out. Use whichever one you decide that you like more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well with all the bad information about Windows and the superiority of Linux (although this may not be true, it's just what I read) I feel I need to learn how to use/network Linux and I feel that using Linux would make compiling faster (probably stupid and really not much faster).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Well with all the bad information about Windows and the superiority of Linux (although this may not be true, it's just what I read) I feel I need to learn how to use/network Linux and I feel that using Linux would make compiling faster (probably stupid and really not much faster).


This is the subject of holy wars, so I will leave my opinion out of it. I will say, though, that practically speaking, and having used tools under both operating systems, that I've not really noticed a significant difference in build times.

If you want to learn Unix style network administration, then I say go for it. Nothing wrong with broadening your skill set, right? It's one more thing you can put on your resume.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by null_void
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Well with all the bad information about Windows and the superiority of Linux (although this may not be true, it's just what I read) I feel I need to learn how to use/network Linux and I feel that using Linux would make compiling faster (probably stupid and really not much faster).


This is the subject of holy wars, so I will leave my opinion out of it. I will say, though, that practically speaking, and having used tools under both operating systems, that I've not really noticed a significant difference in build times.

If you want to learn Unix style network administration, then I say go for it. Nothing wrong with broadening your skill set, right? It's one more thing you can put on your resume.


Yea, it's true about the resume thing. The problem with a linux computer is finding combatible hardware and those problems aren't for this forum.

Anyway, from what you've said, in relation to programming, platform isn't important in terms of performance, so this leads me into temptation to settle with Windows, plus the IDEs I currently use are Windows exclusive.

Thanks for the Advice
TomX

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by pkelly83
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Thanks, what advantages does Linux have over Windows in relation to programming?


Better Editors and more techie oriented environment. Harder to crash it too if you do something dumb by mistake. That goes for any UNIX not just Linux


Hah, I'm not so sure about that. True, the Linux kernel might be near uncrashable, but an awful lot of Linux apps are very sloppy coded, and will crash as soon as you look at them... :)

And to be fair, it's damn hard to crash Windows XP as well.

I'm not saying Windows is better, just saying that crashes aren't impossible when using Linux. Personally I prefer to work in Linux, but I use Windows the rest of the time.

For Java, it really doesn't matter. You can get some good IDE's for both (My favorite, Eclipse, is available on both platforms)

But the main thing is which OS you feel comfortable with. :)
Of course, like Sr_Guapo suggested, dualboot is a nice solution too... No point in using only one OS... (I had 4 at last count)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dual boot. Its not that hard. When you install windows, set aside a 10gig partition for Linux/unix/BSD/whatever. 10gigs is more than enough to experiment with networking and programming.

Linux is not an everyday environment for most people, despite how many linux zealots will tell you otherwise. I've had redhat on my system for a few years now and I rarely have cause to boot into it.

MSs development tools are tightly integrated with Visual Studio which is hands down the best IDE available on any platform(again, dispite what linux zealots will tell you,) the only thing that comes close, IMHO, is Apple's XCode for Mac.

Solely running linux doesn't make much sense unless its a secondary PC perhaps. If you want to play games, you need windows, if you want to be sure that your new hardware is supported, you need windows, if you want to enjoy and draw inspiration from other indy developers on gamedev, you'll need windows(for the most part), I could go on and on and on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for all your advice again.

Hmm, dual-booting... sounds viable, I could install WinXP, download all the required things on WinXP and use it for internet then have Linux too just incase I wanted to experiment. Does anyone know much about the general combatibility of hardware with Suse 9.1?

Thanks in Advance
TomX

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Thanks, what advantages does Linux have over Windows in relation to programming?


*linux comes with everything you need and more. windows doesn't.

*linux doesn't get viruses like windows does

*linux is free

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by clayasaurus
*linux doesn't get viruses like windows does


I like linux, but it can get viruses, it's just there are less out there for linux.

btw: the first rootkits were made for unix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Roboguy
Quote:
Original post by clayasaurus
*linux doesn't get viruses like windows does


I like linux, but it can get viruses, it's just there are less out there for linux.

btw: the first rootkits were made for unix


Of course unix had the first rootkits. Back in the day, windows had no root, or anything like root, to have a kit to become!!! (and linux didn't exist)

OP: If Windows is the only OS you know allready, I'd stick with it. That said, you probably wouldn't be asking this question if you knew linux.

Pros for linux:
easier to install libraries (for non M$ compilers anyways), cheaper.

Pros for windows:
more direct support for .NET and the CRL (or whatever it's called) for mixing languages (M$).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please everyone, focus on the question. This is not the place for this dicussion.

TomX, do you want a development environment for Java?

a. Install your favorite OS, Java will make it impossible to crash it anyway. If you install XP, install SP2 to enhance your security.
b. Download the latest Java SDK from sun.
c. Download Netbeans from www.netbeans.org.

Once you understand Netbeans, its almost the best IDE for Java out there. The aoutoupdates are excellent.

Happy coding!

Guimo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To answer the question: No. There is no best OS for programming. If you're a linux newbie and want to get programming immediately, then I'd suggest that you stick to windows. If you know your way around the linux filesystem and are comfortable using gcc and okay with having a smaller target audience, then maybe linux is right for you. There's a TON of cool stuff out there for linux to tinker with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just read the feature set of Valgrind and now I'm seriously considering switching over to Linux ;)

Quote:
Helgrind is a thread debugger which finds data races in multithreaded programs
Where can I find a utility like this for windows?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Guimo
Please everyone, focus on the question. This is not the place for this dicussion.

TomX, do you want a development environment for Java?

a. Install your favorite OS, Java will make it impossible to crash it anyway. If you install XP, install SP2 to enhance your security.
b. Download the latest Java SDK from sun.
c. Download Netbeans from www.netbeans.org.

Once you understand Netbeans, its almost the best IDE for Java out there. The aoutoupdates are excellent.

Happy coding!

Guimo


Look into python too. Python is IMHO far more simple to learn and just as powerfull as java.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OT: Guimo: I thought we WERE sticking to discussion??? Platform stability is a factor, viruses are a factor, hackability is a factor - Roboguy was simply clarifying clayasaurus's point, and I felt it necessary to note that unix being the first target for rootkits didn't mean it was less secure even back then! (although it probably was, since it was too simple to have much networking support back then)

The OP is likely to work with multiple languages (right tool for the right job, he allready mentioned VB) but he did mention java as his main language. VB support is another pro for windows, however, there are commercial versions for linux, as mentioned in this article, which I havn't looked into myself (I'm broke). Their home page is http://www.realsoftware.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Monkey,

Sorry but the thread was going in other direction... look at the original question:

'What OS is best for Java development, or doesn't it matter?'

Now look at the posts:

*linux comes with everything you need and more. windows doesn't.
*linux doesn't get viruses like windows does
*linux is free
*I like linux, but it can get viruses, it's just there are less out there for linux.
*btw: the first rootkits were made for unix
*Of course unix had the first rootkits. Back in the day, windows had no root, or anything like root, to have a kit to become!!! (and linux didn't exist)
*OP: If Windows is the only OS you know allready, I'd stick with it. That said, you probably wouldn't be asking this question if you knew linux.
*Pros for linux:
easier to install libraries (for non M$ compilers anyways), cheaper.
*Pros for windows:
more direct support for .NET and the CRL (or whatever it's called) for mixing languages (M$).


Many of those arguments are fine in a LinuxVsWindows thread, but considering the question, every Java programmer knows you cant make the OS crash with Java and there are free IDEs for any OS, and any java program will compile and run fine in any OS (it runs in a VM anyway) and dont need any .Net support to run Java.

Thats why I called for peace before war starts.

TomX, I hope you have solved your doubt. In brief, chose the OS you feel more comfortable with...

Luck!
Guimo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Guimo
Sorry but the thread was going in other direction... look at the original question:

Actually, that looked more like the 2nd/3rd question (the first being about programming in general)... I was jumping on this because my rating just dropped 8 points... Now I've gone back to wondering why 0o. Not that I really mind 8 points, I just want to clarify, defend a valid point, or learn what the heck I did explained wrong 0o.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As an indie developer, I code for pretty much everything but the Mac (which I'm learning to). However, dual-boot can have it's problems at times. I often want to switch back and forth to do certain things. I love VS.NET's environment because that's what I learned on, it's hard to switch. But GCC is a great build tool also. Nothing wrong with developing in linux/X, but emacs is too much of a learning curve, and KDevelop is no Visual Studio. I hear Kylix is ok, but it isn't free for C++ last I checked. Java is easy on all platforms, but I only use it for tools programming.

In the end, I'm using two multi-boot systems with pretty much allof the "good" flavors of windows/linux. Each allows me to perform remote debugging - somthing I can't live without - as well as network testing/simulation.

just my $0.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by pkelly83
Quote:
Original post by TomX
Thanks, what advantages does Linux have over Windows in relation to programming?


Better Editors and more techie oriented environment. Harder to crash it too if you do something dumb by mistake. That goes for any UNIX not just Linux


poppycock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this