Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Antony52

A final decision...

This topic is 5415 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I didnt know how to start so I guess the beginning would be a good idea. I always liked 3d and games and all that. That is why I decided to do the MSc in Computer Animation and Special Effects. However when they asked me to specialise in a certain field for my final project I just didnt know what to do. The MSc is half programming and half designer. That is what they are saying. From what I see it it more a designer one. The thing is that what I really like is to use a tool in where I could put some content in a scene and then give it some instructions what to do and also be able to change the graphics by using pixel/vertex shaders languages or maybe C for the core stuff. However I really like the idea of specializing in pixel/vertex shaders ONLY and go from there. My questions would be then: 1) a) Jobwise, what jobs will I find with ONLY pixel/vertex shaders knoweledge?. b) How difficult are the math for pixel/vertex shaders? 2) a) What is the necessary knoweledge a designer must have from programming and in general?. b) Will it be easier to find a job if I know a scripting language, a tool and a 3d package like maya? 3) Is there a tool that will allow me to write code in OGL, code in GLSL and see the actual result? In other words do you suggest to go the programming way or the designer way? Please understand that these are serious questions and if you could answer me with many details I would be grateful. [Edited by - Antony52 on September 24, 2004 1:32:10 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Hello,

I dont know what you know, you should perhaps give more information about how far you are into the stuff.

Quote:
However when they asked me to specialise in a ceratin field for my final project I just didnt know what to do. The MSc is half programming and half designer. That is what they are saying. From what I see it it more a designer one.


I suggest you do what you like most, however you should really have a somewhat broad overview of technology if you want to go design, and vice versa.

Quote:
The thing is that what I really like is to use a tool in where I could put some content in a scene and then give it some instructions what to do and also be able to change the graphics by using pixel/vertex shaders languages or maybe C for the core stuff.


There are excellent tools available for shader/scene building, check out rendermonkey. You also have the option of using one of the many premade game engines, which often come with some sort of script engine and can work together with e.g. rendermonkey.

Quote:
However I really like the idea of specializing in pixel/vertex shaders ONLY and go from there.

If you know OpenGL/D3D reasonably well, there might be opportunities for work. However, I simply don't know, since I am only an amateur.

Quote:
My questions would be then:
1) a) Jobwise, what jobs will I find with ONLY pixel/vertex shaders knoweledge?.

Depends on your math background and finished programs, I suppose.
Quote:
b) How difficult are the math for pixel/vertex shaders?

Thats nothing you can simply tell, as you can use pixel/vertex shaders for almost every purpose, e.g. tex/lighting, shadow mapping, procedural texture generation & frame buffer effecs and many many more.
Generally, you need a rock-solid foundation in Trigonometry and Linear Algebra, as well as some Calculus.
Quote:
2) a) What is the necessary knoweledge a designer must have from programming and in general?.

As I am an amateur, I can only guess based on things I read from people who are in the industry, but I suggest learning at least one mainstream language (C/C++/Java/C#) and one scripting language (python/lua/ruby/lisp(just kidding)) reasonably well, for your own education as well as a proof of your motivation.
Quote:
b) Will it be easier to find a job if I know a scripting language, a tool and a 3d package like maya?

Yes, for obvious reasons.
Quote:
3) Is there a tool that will allow me to write code in OGL, code in GLSL and see the actual result?

Check out rendermonkey from ATI. It's a shader IDE. However, you can't write C code in it.
Quote:
In other words do you suggest to go the programming way or the designer way?

Well, that is your decision. From your posting I deduce that you like the designer way more, so you should perhaps do what you like.

Quote:
Please understand that these are serious questions and if you could answer me with many details I would be grateful.

Also sorry that I am not the most competent person to speak about these things, but since noone else answered, I thought I would throw my 2 cents into the bin.

Greetings,

Konfusius/Thermo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Antony52
1) a) Jobwise, what jobs will I find with ONLY pixel/vertex shaders knoweledge?.
b) How difficult are the math for pixel/vertex shaders?


a) little to no jobs. you need to know at least one major language to a great degree of depth

b) depends on how difficult you think linear algebra is. i think it's pretty easy, but i guess that depends on what your math background is like.

Quote:
Original post by Antony52
2) a) What is the necessary knoweledge a designer must have from programming and in general?.
b) Will it be easier to find a job if I know a scripting language, a tool and a 3d package like maya?


most designers i work with don't know any programming languages at all. a few know some programming languages and they are arguably better at some things that the other designers. for the most part, though, being a level designer is just placing nodes and NPCs in a gui and doing some basic scripting. the scripting we use is unique to our engine and most of it actually has a GUI interface. the challenges designers face are much more on the "how do we make this fun" front than they are technical, problem-solving based challenges. (i.e. i'm not saying the job isn't tough/challenging, just that it's not at all like programming)

Quote:
Original post by Antony52
3) Is there a tool that will allow me to write code in OGL, code in GLSL and see the actual result?
In other words do you suggest to go the programming way or the designer way?


the answer to the first question is yes, it's called a compiler. :) i'd suggest going whichever direction you want. if you want to be a programmer go the programming route, if you want to be a designer, go the designer route. they are very different disciplines with not a lot of crossover. it arguably helps to know a little about the other so you can more effectively work together, but the skillsets are almost completely unrelated.

-me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My "advice":
Stay focused on what you do best, but try to get a basic understanding of all important issues with computer games.

Thermo/Konfu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!