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yuppies

Whats with Longhorn?

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Hey guys ive ust wondering, what is the impact on this in the programming world (spc Game development)? Can we still use MFC? how bout Win32 SDK? Ive just ask this coz there are some rumors in our office that when Longhorn is released MFC will be replaced by something else. What Language to used to create Longhorn Applications? .NET? Ive read about DirectX been renamed to WGF and what will happen now to OpenGL? thanks

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Basicly, everything that works now will still work but the newest tools will be WGF, etc. OpenGL will not be affected as it is not controlled by Microsoft. It's sort of like how Win32 will still run DOS apps (as long as they don't use something not supported, such as some interrupts).

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Quote:
Original post by yuppies
there are some rumors in our office that when Longhorn is released MFC will be replaced by something else.


w0000000000000000t!

Quote:

Ive read about DirectX been renamed to WGF and what will happen now to OpenGL?


Seeing as OpenGL isn't controlled by microsoft, I doubt anything will happen to it. ...and they'd better not mess with directx too much.

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Great... another post about Longhorn. Don't you hate that Microsoft is so secretive? Think about it. Most of today's games run DirectX. Now (most likely) Microsoft isn't just going to drop all compatibility for these games; they *should* still be backwards compatible. Hopefully.

If they're not... wouldn't that suck? And from what I've read, Longhorn actually uses WGF as its desktop renderer. And instead of taking direct control over the display adapter like in DirectX, an app has to go through windows to access it. Sounds like a performace inhibitor to me... [tears]

oh well. What's the use in complaining? Just switch to communism manifested Linux! [razz]

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Although I won't say anything that will violate an NDA, I will say that Microsoft is investing a good deal of work in developing Longhorn to run older applications seamlessly - in general you shouldn't have to worry about your legacy code.

Magius

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Guest Anonymous Poster
"Although I won't say anything that will violate an NDA, I will say that Microsoft is investing a good deal of work in developing Longhorn to run older applications seamlessly - in general you shouldn't have to worry about your legacy code."

Bloody good job my man,because if Longhorn can't use Visual Studio6
and DirectX7,8,and 9 SDK,and run native Win32 apps properly,then it will be just another piece of MS shit to make THEM money correct?

not everyone likes and uses .NET...if you have doubts or wonder how may people don't use .NET why not start a poll -:)

That was friendly enough wasn't it ? see no abusive posts-;)

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I was just trying to ease the worries of the original poster in terms of his / her question.

And you are quite correct, not everyone is using or likes Microsoft .NET. However, Microsoft has done an excellent job of making .NET pervasive already, and it will only be adopted by more and more companies as time goes on, especially with the WinFX functionality.

That said, Microsoft is also making a big push toward the interoperable world in their work on the WS-* standards and web services. Gartner has rated Microsoft the lead company in helping to develop interoperable standards with WS-*. It's a slight shift in focus from the business practices of Microsoft in the past, but necessary with the advent of distributed computing.

Magius

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Original post by Magius
in general you shouldn't have to worry about your legacy code.
Except for that teeny little fact that your code is now legacy code.

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There will always be room for knowing differet technologies for different types of projects. Adoption of a new technology or set of technologies doesn't happen overnight and code doesn't become legacy overnight either - pure Win32 code will still be written and maintained for years to come. However, resisting learning and using new technologies such as .NET only limits your options as it becomes more pervasive through the market place.

I don't want this to turn into a .NET fan forum or bashing session, Win32 code will still run in longhorn and will not go away for a long while.

Magius

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Quote:
Original post by Mushu
And from what I've read, Longhorn actually uses WGF as its desktop renderer. And instead of taking direct control over the display adapter like in DirectX, an app has to go through windows to access it. Sounds like a performace inhibitor to me... [tears]


Actually, it isn't nearly that big of a performance inhibitor. Longhorn uses a completely new driver model that allows the operating system to leverage a lot of functionality in the 3d-accelerated hardware out there. Unless it's canceled or postponed, I wouldn't be surprised to see all sorts of cool stuff like multiple layers of transparency and perhaps some cool 3d effects built into the OS.

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