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gordon7up

question from a total noob

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folks, Probably seen this same question a million times. Im looking to get into game development a bit more from a code level, my background is graphics mainly modelling with Maya. What would be the best way to start out, as I understand it C++ is the way to go? if so should I go with i.e. MS visual C++ or is there better and more widely used compilers? Thanks for reading, Gordon

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Microsoft Visual C++ 2003.net is a popular choice, there are other free compiles out there for Windows(assuming that is your operating system of choice), dev-c++ is an IDE that ships with the mingw compiler, you can get that for free from here.

The most important thing is to buy a C++ book or ten, there is a recommendation list on the site somewhere, then all you need is a few months of patient learning and you should be ready to make something half decent.

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Currently, C++ is the most-used language.

I dare to say also the most over-used language.

And it is damn complex to get everything really right in it.
It is like a sharp edge, not intented for use at home :).
I cutted myself countless times with it, meaning I started a program in C++ (taking up amounts of time) when I just as well could have written a perl/python script.

You may have a much faster start into programming with another language, the script language Python, cause C++ adds to much nitpickery in for the beginner. (Don't take "script" for "toy". Python is used in large commercial games.)

Python, as I discovered recently, is a great language to use in concert with C++, as well on its own. It is a very flexible, dynamic language.

C++ & Python

I would suggest starting out with Python + something like SDL, get some small programs working, and learn C++ whenever you feel comfortable with Python. You will have results in a shorter time and also Python has advanced language concepts which you might overlook if your brain is in "C++-mode". Depends on your mentality :)

Thermo

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Hey... I am new too. C++ is probably the way to go, although I think Java will be the standard in a few years

Microsoft Visual C++ is great... its like the industry standard. Its pretty costly though, ecpecially if you want to publish your game commercially because of all that lisence crap. (I think)

If the cost of a programming book is all your willing to spend, go with Bloodshed Dev-C++.

Also, give Borland C++ Builder a try... it costs about as much is Microsoft Visual C++, and is a close rival to it.

Finally, my favorite and the one I use, DJGPP. Its free, open source, and you dont pay a dime to use it. Lacking a graphical interface, it could be tricky at first but once you get used to it, DJGPP gets the job done and has most all of the goodies any other compiler has!

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Quote:
although I think Java will be the standard in a few years
on cellphones perhaps....


Quote:
...DJGPP...
it is also a DOS only compiler...

This from the DJGPP website....
Quote:
Where we are now
Version 2.00 shipped on February 5, 1996, after more than two years of development. Version 2.01 shipped October 19, 1996. Version 2.02 shipped December 6, 1998.


That said, I use the DJGPP compiler only for a tiny operating system I am freaking aroung with.... but it was great the time it was popular.. remember the RHIDE?

Thermo

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Hello !

Quote:
Original post by Runyon
Hey... I am new too. C++ is probably the way to go, although I think Java will be the standard in a few years

Microsoft Visual C++ is great... its like the industry standard. Its pretty costly though, ecpecially if you want to publish your game commercially because of all that lisence crap. (I think)


The Visual C++ .NET 2003 kit is free, and I don't think the license prohibits you to distribute your products. It comes with no IDE at all, a lot of libs are missing, but you may want to have a try.

Quote:
Original post by Runyon
If the cost of a programming book is all your willing to spend, go with Bloodshed Dev-C++.


Dev-C++ is free of charge. It is an open source project. It can be downloaded here

Quote:
Original post by Runyon
Also, give Borland C++ Builder a try... it costs about as much is Microsoft Visual C++, and is a close rival to it.

Finally, my favorite and the one I use, DJGPP. Its free, open source, and you dont pay a dime to use it. Lacking a graphical interface, it could be tricky at first but once you get used to it, DJGPP gets the job done and has most all of the goodies any other compiler has!


The DJGPP compiler do not allow you to create windows applications. It can only create DOS 32 bit applications (the so-called console applications). While it is interresting, you must know that you can do the same using Dev-C++. The only thing you cannot do is to very low-level stuff - and while I agree that manipulating int 33h may be funny, I'm not sure it is that interesting...

Regards,

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hey thanks for the mega fast response :)

I have toyed with C++ a while ago in a class I took but it was boring data base entry etc, this put me way off programming and stuck with modelling (maya that is not on a cat walk or the likes :))
Never heard of Python but will definately investigate a bit more, mean while I'll take a look at somw free C++ compilers as recommended and get a few books. Can anyone recommend a good game dev book for beginners?

Thanks again folks,

Gordon

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Again, C++ is a b!7*h to learn. Really. Prepare to bang your head against the wall several times. If you want to spend the next years fiddling with C++ issues, then do it. If you want result, you should look for alteratives.
Don't want to discourage you, but a book on "Game Development", you are not going to learn a lot of programming from it.

Thermo

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