Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Warsong

Need vs want in a game for educational game

This topic is 5463 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

The word educational game is a despised word which many will walk away from it. Basically you have to hide education from a game and show that it’s not educational but it should be subliminal. Also studies have also shown that the best educational games are those where you can not see that it's educational. If the game is educational and you want it to do well then do not say it is anything that is remotely close to the word educational it seems to adults. But if it is for kids under 6 then that’s ok if the parents sees it on the box. Kind of like Christmas when kids get clothes they hate it but if they get a leather jacket then some are pleased. If you had a game that involved math and numbers try to implement it to something practical that you do not need math in the beginning, and I think that when the game gets harder people will want to use numbers so that they can get an advantage, and will not consider it math. We don't force and tell them they need to use numbers but make it that they will want to use the numbers. It’s a matter of need and want, and many people do not want to be told what they need to do, but they will do what they want. Make them feel they are in control. Also gradually increasing the difficulty would help push them to learn more, and it would be better if the game adjusted to an individual person’s level. The game has to have the right balance to not turn off the player. Again I said this many times but here it is again a site that said that games in general were for educational reasons. http://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/fac/peabody/game-book/Chapter2.html Hey if you get something out from a game that helps you in life then that is a better game than the top selling games out now. If some people have more suggestions to add on that would be cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
I guess many can not come up with more educational content ideas, but those physics games are close enough to an educational game. Being creative does not mean to take shortcuts but to take a challenge. It’s like making the best with what you have. Kind of like Tetris how you have so much space on the screen but you have to be organized and think out well how to best place the pieces to take less space. Just like that to know how to use what you have the best people should challenge themselves to use practical thing the best way they can. But have so much creative freedom and use it for meaningless things.

Kind of like if a guy uses 1 arm in a boxing match against a guy with 2 arm and the match ends as a draw that does not mean that it is truly a draw. Many here uses everything at their disposal to make a ½ decent meaningless violent game but some that use what needs to be used with a positive message with also is ½ decent does not mean both games are the same.

I think designers should stop making action game clones since there is so much more that can be made.

[Edited by - Warsong on October 1, 2004 3:41:35 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You think? lol
More like people do not have a comment on this subject. Hey saying some information on educational game can benefits others. If this information does not relate to you or you don’t care then your loss.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To me, the most educational games have been Civilization and Colonization. Catch the players interest 'bout something and then have a handy library for them to read all about it.

A cool kind of educational game would be something akin to the Incredible Machine, but with more physics involved. Kinda like the idea someone posted about where you build a catapult.
To reach the higher levels, you have to be real good, and if it's fun, players will take the time to read the user-friendly help-file about physics to beat the game.

Other games that have educated me:
* Dusk of the Gods. Taught norse mythology.
* Pacific Strike. Got me interested in the WW2 pacific theatre.
* Simant. I've liked ants ever since.

Note that none of these games where educational and all came with either a manual full of info or a civ-style-pedia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting information
I heard that star craft got an award for being educational, but I have not played it and one person that played it found it strange that it got the award.

I agree that a physics game with a catapult would be appealing and it would be simple to make if done right.

Many will not like a long manual and would rather learn while they play.

Would an action game have learning concepts in it or will civ-style games be on top?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hehe I don't try to advertise this game, but check out Europa Universalis II, which basically simulates world history through the 15th to 19th centuries. In my opinion it is really one of those games that are able to teach world history (despite the game outcomes are not always incredibly historical with the AI in charge in singleplayer mode). The game has these "historical events" that include texts about their historical justification, as well as in-game effects such as a stability drop, technology increase, etc.

More importantly, this game is fun and is certainly not advertised as educational game although I'd imagine it could be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!