Sign in to follow this  

what is it to "normalize" a vector or a matirx

This topic is 4817 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

For vectors it means to make it so that it has a length of 1.

For matrices, I'd say it means that each axial vector of the rotation submatrix has a length of 1. Typically, you might want your matrix to me orthonormal, which would be that plus the component vectors being orthogonal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A normalised vector lets you represent a direction without implying, or more importantly scaleing, any length. For example say you have many objects moving in the same direction but with different speeds. By multiplying the normalised direction vector with the objects speed for each object you can find their new positions after a unit of time has passed. However if the direction vector was not normalised, its length would scale the multiplication giving you distorted answers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
'normalising' a matrix probably means 'ortho-normalising' a matrix, like an orientation matrix or rotation matrix.

3x3 matrices can be seen as 3 vectors loaded in either each rows or each columns of the matrix, depending if your maths uses row-major or column major.

Then normalising that matrix would be equivalent to having those vectors (each rows or each columns) to be of unit length, and each of the 3 vectors should be perpendicular to the two others, to avoid skewed matrices, which would graphically bend the rendering (objects would stretch in some direction or look really weird), and for physics, would basically screw up pretty much anything that uses the matrix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 4817 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this