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Accra1Prog

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Accra1Prog    122
Behind every great Programmer, is a collection of Game Programming book's that give priceless information on how to develop cutting edge Video game product. Can seasoned professionl's how have skill's in developing Cutting Edge Video Game product, please recommend me good Books.

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Evil Steve    2017
I'm particularly fond of the Game Programming Gems series, I'm halfway through the 4th (most recent) book. You get a nice range of tips from those.

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hplus0603    11347
Actually, reading available source from a bunch of games, and trying to do it yourself over and over, is probably much more likely the source of good game programmers than books. Books can only take you so far (which isn't very).

That being said, I think the Game Programming Gems series is pretty good, as far as books go.

However, if you want to learn more, then download the Quake III sources (they're OpenSource now, right? Else use Quake II) and read through it. Figure out how simulation works. Figure out how rendering works. Figure out how networking works. Trace through it in the debugger. That'll teach you a lot more than any book can.

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Steadtler    220
Maybe it is because of my strong academic experience, but I have to disagree with hplus0603, in the sense that I feel it is necessary to have a strong theoric basis before diving into somebody-else code.

For the graphic and general game programming, and at the risk of sounding like a brownnoser, I very like "Opengl Game Programming".

For the networking, I like "Computer Networking: A top-down approach featuring the internet". Very comprehensive.

I never read a satisfactory IA book yet, so I cant recommend one.

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Spudder    385
For general programming the best C++ book I've bought without doubt is "C++ The Complete Refernece 3rd Edition", it's a bit of a doorstop but it's proved itself invaluable when looking up standard library functions when you can't quite remember the paramters.

It also contains a complete overview of all of C and C++ features and how to use them. Highly recommended.

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umbrae    308
I happen to not use books that much (the only book I have is Game Physics - David H Eberly). I use the internet. I found that I only used books for reference, not for learning so I started using the internet much more for both. Here are a few sites that are great.

C++ Library Reference
OpenGL Blue Book
PHP Reference
MySQL Reference

Basically any search in google for "<topic> reference" will give you some kind of online reference - it may be ugly, but you can search it, unlike a book.

Also the great thing about some really cool online documentation is that there are user comments, that can actually be even more helpful than the documentation itself. Also online references can be updated, books cannot. With the speed of development within the computer field books can be quite quickly outdated.

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Talonius    643
Quote:
Original post by Steadtler
Maybe it is because of my strong academic experience, but I have to disagree with hplus0603, in the sense that I feel it is necessary to have a strong theoric basis before diving into somebody-else code.


I've got no formal schooling whatsoever, and I agree with your statement wholeheartedly. The average individual requires knowledge of the foundation before they can learn how to frame walls. While perusing other source may be a short term benefit for a particular circumstance, it does not teach you how to critically think and solve the problem on your own.

The next problem you run into or want to figure out how to do you'll be flabbergasted because your knowledge won't be where it should.

As well the theory and "book learning" does wonders with mathematical algorithms and common purposes of the same. "Oh, look, he's doing some funky trig stuff in here, what's he doing?" It could be a common function to determine distance on a 3D plane -- but you can't tell.

Not to say that you have to go to college to learn, but I've had a much rougher go of it at many times because of my lack of formal education. It's a much tougher road to travel.

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