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danne89

[.net] Managed Direct3D compared to unmanaged

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Hi, I'm trying to learn managed Direct3D, but it's going quite slowly. The question I've is: How big is the difference between unmanaged and managed Direct3D? Can I benefit from reading a book on unmanaged Direct3D, if I only really wants to use the managed version? I know that Miller's saying that the differeces isn't so big, but he is maybe not the most objective man in the world. Thanks, Daniel Lännström

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The models of use are very very similar, but the syntax is significantly different. I would suggest that you study both, learning primarily with whichever is easier for you, but keeping in touch with the other as well.

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The difference is mostly just in the naming. Managed has the same stuff as unmanaged, but lacks all that COM naming mess. You also no longer have to worry about pointers, HRESULTs, etc...

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I gave it a try and found it easier (well duh it's c#) and faster than c/c++. What took 10k lines took only hundreds, so development was faster. Our engine also seemed faster in terms of FPS.

HOWEVER... we still aren't going to use it until enough customers have .net on their machines. We can't attach it to our distribution, it's much too large.

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Ok. But as far I understand it, it's more resources about unmanaged Direct3D out there, right? So it's maybe easier to find information about unmanaged DirectX.

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danne89, unfortunately what you say about the lack of resources with Managed DirectX is true. You can find articles about setting up a device and such, but what good is that once you are past the basics, right? I'm hoping that there will be more resources out there as .NET is adopted more. God knows that I'm trying. IMO, if you are familiar with C++ and unmanaged DirectX, it isn't that difficult to take that knowledge and apply that to Managed DirectX development. Unfortunately, that does't aid someone with no C++ experience. Luckily, it sounds like you perhaps do have some C++ experience, so it shouldn't be that big of a deal.

As with learning a computer language, once you learn the concepts behind 3d graphics, it is a simple matter of just applying your knowledge to the given context, whether that be unmanaged DirectX, managed DirectX, or OpenGL. If you learn all the concepts behind the code, then you will be in good shape no matter what choice you make.

As to which one to learn, it really depends on what your goals are. If you are wanting to become a console developer, and you are aiming for a goal of 3 years or less to get into the industry, I would focus on C++ and unmanaged DirectX. If you are in it more for the long-run or just PC-based programming, I would go with Managed DirectX and the managed language of your choice.

This is just my two cents, though.

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Thanks for taking time to answer. I do indeed know C++, but just have the basics in managed Direct3D and nothing in unmanaged.

I've read some in the "Managed DirectX: Starer Kit" and that book seems to me lack of many things. Am I, as I may susspect, just lacking the basic knowleage of 3D, you're speaking about.

Perhaps, we'll see more and more titles on managed DirectX with the time; but they may not have the best-selling prices todays DirectX books have. I gues I must try to get some sort of stipendium.

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