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phil05

What language would fast-pace companies usually go for?

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I've been programming the win32 api for a long ass time, still it seems somewhat slow and hard to manage. I know companies are all about speed and less to spend regarding budget and time. What language would they usually go for? Would they use Visual Basic although support is no longer available? Would they use C#? Which would be the most benefitial one to learn? please note: i'm speaking of applications programming, not games.

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If you want to write a GUI application, WinForms (which is part of .Net) would be a good thing to go for (though if you want people to use your application they have to have the .Net Framework).

Alternatively there is MFC or WTL which are both basically C++ wrappers for the Win32 API.

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Java is being used more and more as it shakes off the stigma of being 'slow' [and as more graduates are taught it rather than C++]

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Visual Basic is still used a lot. I think VB6 is going to be around forever, just like COBOL. There's been a hella lot of code written and it costs too much to rewrite for the next language of the day.

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I recently talked to representatives from a lot of companies (and I still don't have a job - oh well), and they all wanted either C++ or Java (or both).

-RC

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Many companies are flexible, and use different tools for different jobs. The ability to learn and adapt to new languages / tools / paradigms is key to succeeding in today's environment. That said, you can never go wrong having a solid background in the fundamentals (such as C++). Many businesses are moving the way of .NET as well so knowing any .NET language couldn't hurt you in the long run.

Magius

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Quote:
Original post by RabidCow
I recently talked to representatives from a lot of companies (and I still don't have a job - oh well), and they all wanted either C++ or Java (or both).
That's because those languages, and particularly C++, introduce enough difficult concepts that someone proficient in them is nearly guaranteed to be able to learn any new technology. It's an employment discriminant, not an indication of the office toolkit.

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If you are interested in a job in the commercial sector i'd go for C#. A lot of companies take the step from Visual basic to C# nowadays, since it's simply a hell of a lot better than VB :)
And since .NET allows you to use different languages in one project, (old) VB code can still be used while coding the rest of your project in C#.

In the technology sector C,C++ is still a safe bet.

Java is a good language to learn OO, that's the main reason it's being thought to students. So you can use that knowledge in other languages. However 'hybrid' languages (like C++) are still more widely used.

Anyway, some advice:
Many languages look alike in certain aspects . I took the time to learn Java, C, some functional language and some assembly. This will provide you with practically all the basic ideas used in many different languages. Given a reference and some simple tutorials you should be able to pick up a new language in less than 3 days :) (Up goes your market-value :) )

Good Luck,

Eddy

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I think java is a very bad language to learn OO, take multiple inheritance for example, some stuff that exists in OO simply you can't do in java, that leads to lot's of java developers of not knwoing many good things about OO just because it isn't possible in java..
if the idea is learn OO trough a language, it may worth trying smalltalk, learning java to learn OO you will learn java way to do stuff, not OO stardard

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