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Learning ASM

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I like the thread in the General Programming forum about stable programming. It has brought me to a conclusion I've been struggling to reach. I want to learn assembly. I really don't know much about it other than it's low level - dealing with pumping specific instructions through the cpu. I've even SEEN some from old arcade games and various places through other source. The thing is I wanna make sure I learn the right language. I have VC.NET (7). I want to learn assembly that will work in that IDE but I don't want to learn some specific MS or VS version of the language. Can somebody point me to a good place to get started? I know higher-level languages if that helps you decide a fair-paced tutorial or book. THANKS!

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The above book uses NASM syntax.

Here's how to set up MASM with Visual Studio (should you choose that, I'd imagine the others arent too different).

MASM syntax is used in this generally highly regarded, free book.

[Edited by - Woodsman on October 7, 2004 8:32:45 PM]

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I definitely recommend NASM. It is very elegant in it's simplicity. The only thing that I had (and still have...) a hard time remembering is the difference between "$" and "$$". It's also free (as in beer) and well maintained. Although, I'm not sure if it supports the new 64 bit extensions thus far.

The learning curve for assembly language is _VERY_ steep at first. You will feel overwhelmed at first, but all at once things will just click. You need to download the x86 processor manuals from Intel if you plan to do x86 assembly.

My first project in assembly was a simple "operating system." It would boot and pass control to a "kernel" (I use the term loosly) written in C. It also had a simple console "driver" which wasn't really a driver at all and more like a static library.

EDIT: And one last thing; the name of my "OS" was "DumbOS," which I thought was pretty clever at the time.

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A couple of years ago I found an ebook that showed how to use NASM together with VisualStudio, and I found that pretty convenient. I can't remember where it is or how it is done, but I'll let you know when I find it.

Cheers,
Drag0n

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