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I want to pitch a brilliant idea!!!

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I would like to pitch to game developers, preferably those who are located in the San Fran bay area. I know it sounds lame but the idea is just too brilliant to "just f---ing post".

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Sounds like you need to research the local area and the people that you want to pitch it to. Make sure you have research to back it up as ideas are often ten-a-penny, you'll be taken that bit more seriously if you have a research portfolio to back up your idea and a presentation prepared. Other than that, I'd say to look into who's around you and call them up to set up a meeting. I'm intrigued, what is the idea? [wink]

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Q. How much does it cost to come up with an Idea ?

A. Nothing !

Q. How much is an idea worth ?

A. Nothing !

I suggest you post your idea for what it's worth (Nothing)...

Don't tell me your idea though, I might of thought of it yesterday or I just might use it. GOOD LUCK.

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Hey,

Mate i know how you feel, drop me a line (kooktroop @ deletethistext gmail.com )

Let me know about your idea. But realise, most ideas have already been thought of. No matter what im more than happy to help you.

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I'll wager all my money that you can't implement this idea yourself within the next 5 years?

Come to think of it, I'll wager half my money that no one could ;)

Care to tell me if I'm right?

(If I'm wrong I'll rate you up, :) )

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Can you rate me up ? damn rating system ... too bad it wasn't more like experts-exchange .. I've been demoted :) Even frankskye has a higher rating than me , hahaha , thats funny.

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If its really that good you'd do far better to implement the idea yourself and then sell off your company to the highest bidder.

There are plenty of big examples of this (Such as Lucas with his Pixar division sold to Disney) and smaller ones.

Write a business plan. There is software out there to help you do it and then find private investors.

And the best piece of advice that I've seen posted from time to time. INVEST YOUR OWN MONEY!

If you aren't willing to than surely no one else will be.

Even if you got to stand in front of them and they loved the idea, it would be worth very little money to you with nothing behind it.

Better chance they would simply steal it just as quick as your afraid someone on these forums would.

I mean NO IDEA, repeat NO IDEA is that clearly brilliant that it is a sure winner. There is going to be a gamble and only those that ante up have a chance at winning the pot.

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If it's really a great and original idea, then patent it. You'll be out about 350$- surely something just about anybody can foot as an important investment. Then you can charge royalties from game companies if they choose to use your idea. For it to be patentable it better be quite original though, we're talking, "you mean use a computer program for entertainment?!" - really ground breaking, mind blowing, earth shaking originality.
It generally sucks when people patent common sense things as if nobody else could have thought of them- in many cases they've even been done before, and there's a good chance you wouldn't get anything out of a law suit if it wasn't an incredibly unique idea.
Once patented, you would merely need to advertise your idea publicly and wait for a bite- if somebody snags it then you can make them pay royalties.
I can tell you though, there's not much new under the sun- chances are I've already thought of your idea. Hell, in my idle musing I've come up with stuff NASA is researching that I didn't know existed before. Ideas really are cheap- it's when they work in a cohesive and balanced system of other 'original' ideas that you begin to build something worth while.

The old adage comes to mind; put enough monkeys in a room with typewriters and eventually they'll type Shakespeare- the same is ultimately true with the cells in the human brain.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
A demonstration of your idea would help sell it (better patent it first, or if the idea is obvious they will use it and not give you a dime).

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It's been said, ideas are not worth anything without the ability to implement them. However, draw up an non-disclosure agreement (NDA) and get anyone you talk to to sign it before you say a thing. It is unlikely that anyone will make a million from your idea but at least that way you can sue them if someone else steals it. Good luck.

Mark
Cornutopia Games
http://www.cornutopia.net

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Mark, the problem with that is, unless he is offering them money why will they want to sign an NDA with him. All he has to offer is his idea, they cant legally bind themselves to something with no incentive.

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Quote:
Original post by frankskye
I would like to pitch an idea that I've had that might just change the way games are played and built. How do I go about doing so?

Note the word "MIGHT" as in, will not.

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Well, first of all this is what you should do; write down your idea as detailed as possibly and then let it rest for at least a month or so before looking at it again. After that, if the idea is still appealing to you, take your time and write a complete design-document.

Now, it's time to prepare the pitching, the design document is just the base. The more content you are able to supply, the bigger the chances of getting someones attention. Sample code, concept drawings, storyboards or something similar are good ways of improving your chances.

Now, who to pitch it to? First of all, big game producing companies aren't interested in ideas, they have their own payed people to come up with ideas and pretty much all of them got something like this..besides, if your idea really is revolutionary, then you have to keep in mind that the risk of the idea flopping is much much greater and that makes it less appealing.

So, we pretty much ruled out the big companies. That leaves us with the indies.

The indiemarket might be interested in fresh ideas, but if you've got no skills in actual content creation (sound, conceptart, code, modeling etc.) the chances of any team willing to "hire" you as designer drops to nigh impossible. After all, why would a team want to keep someone around for the duration of the production if they can't contribute anything? On the other hand, if you do, then it's just to contact indies, try to arrange some kind of presentations and then try to convince them why they should pursue your idea instead of any of their own. As already said, the better the presentation, the better the chances are.

However, if you've got no content creations skills, your only chance of seeing your idea in reality would pretty much be to post the design document in the design forum and hope that someone will pick up on it. Really, what's there to lose? The chances of your idea actually getting pulled of raises, and so what if it get stolen? If you can't produce content, it's not like you would be able to pull it off on your own in the foreseeable future anyway.

Disclaimer: I don't have any industry experience whatsoever, this is just the common knowledge I've picked up while visiting this boards for the past years. So take this with a grain of salt.

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There are options for presenting things to the bigger companies. You just cannot approach them direct, or at least most people can't. But you can use various types of agent-like companies that you basically submit your idea too and then PAY THEM to evaluate it. This costs generally between $200 to $1000 for more idea oriented stuff. They in turn have relationships with the big companies (or so they will claim) and will present only the brightest ideas that they receive. They will sign NDA's and all that but even they state that 99% of what they are PAID to evaluate is utter crap. But at least your idea will be in front of "industry experts".

But its one way to bring closure to your delima. Minus $200 or so of your own money at least you'll be able to move onto other projects that might actually make you something :)

And who knows, maybe they will think it has lots of potential...

As I said before if you won't invest $200-$1000 into your own idea then no one else will.

Have you actually run this idea past someone with ALOT of experience in the industry? Often what seems like a fabulous idea to a beginner is actually not currently feasible or possible. How often here do you here that someone wants to make the next GREATEST RTS game of all time. This one with thousands upon thousands of units per side. While that might seem like the next logical progression of RTS games to a beginner, there are simply reasons why the AAA companies have not already done this.

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you cannot patent an idea ... patents are only for INVENTIONS ... and the rules of applicability are that it must have been non-obvious (which an idea can be of course), and require the investment of time to develop / research it to the point of working. A research team has to actually do research to turn an idea into a patentable development ... period.

A person cannot say ... I have the idea for this thing called "encryption", it will protect data from prying eyes, i'm gonna patent it, then figure it out. You have to figure out the exact details first, THEN you patent it, which only covers the exact details you have figured out - and if someone else comes up with another alternate method of acomplishing the same goal, they can get their own patent.

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Thanks so much for the input. Sounds like I should not rely on anyone other then myself to bring this idea to fruition. This is all very new to me. I'm am not a code guy. But I would like to check out some of the engines out there. What I really need to do is take specific parts of certain games bring them together and find a way to have them work smoothly. Since I am more of a concept guy I will start there and write up some ideas to build the engine around.

How do I get a-hold of engines to work with? Where do I start?

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Frankskye, I'm sorry, but you said you are not a "code" guy, so you don't know how games are built. And yet, you claim to have an idea that will "change the way games are built". Isn't this a little weird? How are you suppose to change the way things are, when you don't even know how things are?

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Quote:
Original post by Xai
you cannot patent an idea ... patents are only for INVENTIONS ... and the rules of applicability are that it must have been non-obvious (which an idea can be of course), and require the investment of time to develop / research it to the point of working. A research team has to actually do research to turn an idea into a patentable development ... period.



You can patent a PROCESS and other things besides pure inventions. Magic the Gathering had a patent originally for the "trading card game process" and it could not be directly duplicated. Not sure if it still applies. Most games do not get patents which is why its pretty easy (and legal) to steal ideas from any game you want. Names are trademarked, Text and Graphics are copyrighted, but everything else in the game is pretty much free reign... Unless your lucky or ingenuitive enough to get a patent.

I believe Monopoly still has a patent on the overall game mechanics for instance. Which is why making a "Monopoly clone" is not legal for anyone that isnt licenses to do so.

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That's just what I mean! I need to take several pieces of games and put them together so that my idea works. There is nothing out there that does what I have in mind(as far as I know).

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I am afraid that publishers and developers don't buy game design concepts from people who have no proven design experience. There are several reasons why this is so. For the full answer to this frequently asked question read http://www.obscure.co.uk/faq_idea.shtml. If you already knew someone who ran a dev company and they trusted your opinions they might listen but to a stranger you are just one of the thousands of wannabes.

Selling great ideas has always been hard. The wind up radio and the Dyson bagless vacuum-cleaner are just two examples of where people ended up having to do it themselves. If your idea is so great that it deserves to be made then it deserves that you put the effort in to learn to make it. If your idea isn't worth your time then it is unlikely that others will invest their time.

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Quote:
Original post by BioMors
If it's really a great and original idea, then patent it. You'll be out about 350$


Be warned that it can end up costing a lot more than that to get the patent fully valid. My most recent one will have cost more than $10,000 by the time it's complete (it's 99% of the way there), and will have taken 3 years. It's cheap to START a patent application, but lots of costs rack up over the years (and, note, it usually requires 2 years minimum to actually get it; sometimes as long as 5 or more).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Someone mentioned getting an NDA before talking to a publisher about an idea. That is a good idea (and almost always required) but you should be very skeptical that that will keep somebody from taking your idea. Ideas in general are very hard to protect.

Once, I have a good friend at publisher A who asked us, developer x, if we were interested in a certain game idea. A few months later I went to work for developer y, and I saw there that they had a written pitch for almost the same game that I had been approached by the publisher to do. The people at developer y claimed that had pitched it to publisher A, and if the publisher was still pursuing it they shouldn't be. Of course the guy I knew at publisher A said that developer y got the idea from them.. I'm sure that everyone was under NDA.

In the real world no one is going to sort this sort of thing out with a lawsuit. In general, never tell ideas to people who can implement them without you if you don't want them to. What I have seen happen many, many times is that one person will tell an idea to another person and then a few months later (or so) the other person will become convinced it was his idea, or that something very close is his idea. People don't usually think they are taking ideas, they just often forget what they thought of and what they remember.

If you have never gotten paid to design a game or create a technology, you probably should just give your ideas away in the hopes that you can convince someone your ideas have value. If you have gotten paid for your IP, it has a track record and you should guard it very carefully.

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