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Seriema

[web] creating a online CV/about me website, any tips on CMS's?

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Hi there! I'm deciding to make a about me page. A online resume if you wish. I want it to include my interests, my projects, my education and my working experience. I was thinking of doing it myself using ASP.NET. But right now I don't have time since I'm trying to get out some projects to have in my portfolio. Plus I've noticed that it's better to have played with a existing library/game engine/whatever before making your own. So I'm wondering if you guys know of any free Content Management System's that you've tried out and liked? I don't need much. But I need it free, and preferably open source. Any tips? Cheers! /JP

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I've been using PostNuke for a few years now. My version has a lot of mods to it, but it works pretty well unmodified. I like it better than some of the other blog-style CMS's because I can write complex modules inside the CMS.

Here is my site
bengarvey.com

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Just put together a resume saying your work experience, groups you're part of, your education, etc. Format it nicely in HTML and put it on your site! If you don't have a website yet, check out the FAQ. I'd actually recommend attempting to make your own (website that is, instead of using a CMS). It also gives you some experience with web programming.

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For a simple "about me" type page a CMS would be overkill. My personal preference for small/static sites is to use Apache Cocoon and XSLT to generate the site offline then upload it to the server. Individual pages are done in pure XHTML and then I use an XSLT stylesheet to add global page elements (navigation, etc) and apply styling. When the site's done I just use wget to create a bunch of static HTML pages for uploading. It has a lot of the advantages of a CMS and a lot more flexibility. The learning curve is somewhat steep if you are unfamiliar with XML, but there are plenty of resources and I'd be glad to answer any questsions you post on these boards.

For really small sites, even CSS and some properly structured HTML can go a long way.

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Quote:
Original post by BenGarvey
I've been using PostNuke for a few years now. My version has a lot of mods to it, but it works pretty well unmodified. I like it better than some of the other blog-style CMS's because I can write complex modules inside the CMS.

Here is my site
bengarvey.com


That looks pretty good, I'll try to make a simple page to try it out. Thx!

Quote:
Original post by Rob Loach
Just put together a resume saying your work experience, groups you're part of, your education, etc. Format it nicely in HTML and put it on your site! If you don't have a website yet, check out the FAQ. I'd actually recommend attempting to make your own (website that is, instead of using a CMS). It also gives you some experience with web programming.


Those are actually good tips. But I've already done several websites, using HTML+CSS and PHP+XHTML+XML+XSL. And I'm currently building up my portfolio. This is why I want a management system. And before making my own, I'd like to get a feel for what's out there. I still have about 2 years of university left, so I'll be adding stuff to my portfolio during that time :)

Quote:
Original post by igni ferroque
For a simple "about me" type page a CMS would be overkill. My personal preference for small/static sites is to use Apache Cocoon and XSLT to generate the site offline then upload it to the server. Individual pages are done in pure XHTML and then I use an XSLT stylesheet to add global page elements (navigation, etc) and apply styling. When the site's done I just use wget to create a bunch of static HTML pages for uploading. It has a lot of the advantages of a CMS and a lot more flexibility. The learning curve is somewhat steep if you are unfamiliar with XML, but there are plenty of resources and I'd be glad to answer any questsions you post on these boards.

For really small sites, even CSS and some properly structured HTML can go a long way.


Thanks for the tips! I'll try to whip up a small page using this method too. Looks really nice though :) Whatever method I choose I've been inspired by CSS Zen Garden, so I want the layout controlled by CSS. The data I would like to keep in a database. But when it comes to the actual page, doing it by PHP or ASP or ASP.NET or pure XHTML, I'm not sure yet.


Thanx for the tips everyone!

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Quote:
Original post by Seriema
But when it comes to the actual page, doing it by PHP or ASP or ASP.NET or pure XHTML, I'm not sure yet.

I would vote XHTML and CSS with a backend of PHP and SQL. It gives you an easy way to change the design while giving you the power of dynamic pages. You could also take the evolutional approach and go through a XML document to manage page content. It's completely up to you and what you find would be the easiest to allow growth and manipulation.

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My site

Designed using XML+XSLT converted to HTML, my web page is incredibly easy to maintain without many of the risks of running an actual backend for dynamic content.

I simply create an XML file containing a new portion for the site and upload it. I can then either execute a command which will force a rehash of the directory structure which will link in the new file, or I can wait for my cron job to run (every hour) and let regenerate the structure for me.

Fun Fun ;)

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sounds good!

I forgot the most important part of my webpage though! Multilingual! The user can choose what language. I want it to be in four different languages, to show that I really know those languages. Except for the news/blog, that can be in english. So I'm gonna need a system that allows/demands the contents in several languages.

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Quote:
Original post by Seriema
I forgot the most important part of my webpage though! Multilingual! The user can choose what language. I want it to be in four different languages, to show that I really know those languages. Except for the news/blog, that can be in english. So I'm gonna need a system that allows/demands the contents in several languages.

You're pretty hardcore.

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XHTML was designed to support this, and Cocoon could make it easy to generate several lenguage specific pages from a multilingual XHTML file. You would set up a pipeline element something like:


<map:match pattern="*/*.html">
<map:generate type="file" src="{2}.html"/>
<map:transform type="xslt" src="translate.xslt">
<map:parameter name="language" value="{1}"/>
</map:transform>
<map:serialize type="xhtml"/>
</map:match>





You then create a stylesheet that selects the appropriate language. This way you can go to <code>http://localhost:8888/en/index.html</code> and it will generate an English page for you from the multilingual source XHTML. When you pull these to static HTML you end up with different translations in directories named after the language codes.

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