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SKSlayer

MSVC versus Borland

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I am using MSVC++6 ... I was wondering why would borland be better or worse ? Tell me what you think of each of em

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It depends on what you are building, what you are used to, and more. We need more information than what you posted.

For starters though, VC++ is used for games more than any other compiler. That is a fact. However, that surely does not mean that you have to use it. I use Borland Builder-5 a lot and I really like it. You can build about anything in Builder that you can build in VC++. Builder is more "Visual" than Visual C++ is, which makes the naming in my opinion wrong. Not much about VC++ is visual. Builder takes up a lot less hard drive space in comparison to the MSDN that VC++ requires for help. Whether you build component type applications or DirectX or OpenGL games, Builder does just fine. There are not nearly the amount of books for C++Builder as there are for Visual Studio, but any C or C++ code is valid.

Larry.

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VC++ is the industrie standard. And there are very good reasons why it is so...

Tim

--------------------------
glvelocity.gamedev.net
www.gamedev.net/hosted/glvelocity

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What he means by more visual is that Borland C++ Builder is more of a RAD (Rapid Application Development) tool like Delphi or Visual Basic. The form development is tightly integrated with the code. You can drop a button on the form and then write code for that button by simply double clicking on the button in design time. It uses event driven programming (a mouse move is an event), as apposed to Visual studio which uses window messages (more complicated but more powerfull).

Jason A.

---
I write code.

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That''s wrong. VC++ can do the plain win32 code but it is also the perfect tool for writing MFC code. And with MFC, you can do exactly what you described. ...You can even mix both, nop

Tim

--------------------------
glvelocity.gamedev.net
www.gamedev.net/hosted/glvelocity

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Unless I''m misinformed Borland C++ Builder 5 (some editions) also have support for MFC.

Null and Void
"In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!" --Homer Simpson

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VC have classview, which I think sucks, And I like more to code my self by hand
If I want to make a class, I think it is better just to type
class myclass
{
};

I don''t understand what could mean visual in C++ (Except creating dialog boxes) (Well, I see what are MFC)

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Why anyone would want to get caught up in MFC is beyond good reasoning. That is an MS mess! Yes Builder does have access to MFC. You can write Win32 apps just the same in Builder as you can in VC++ too and never use a form or control. I really like the idea that the next version of Builder will not be the mess that Visual Studio 7 is going to be. Boy I started a fight now I bet! Oohhh, do some of you feel your blood boiling over that one?

What I meant by Visual in my earlier post is RAD, Rapid Application Development. If you build apps that use the visual controls then you will see what Visual and RAD really mean. You can also create your own controls, and edit the existing controls. In VC++ working with resource files is kind of a pain, in Builder it is a breeze.

Just the facts.

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Borland has a lot more imaging libraries for DOS programming such as the Borland Graphics Interface (BGI) of the sound() function but MSVC is a lot more win32 oriented with more powerful developing tools and that stuff

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