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Boris Karloff

How great is Code Complete 2nd Edition?

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Boris Karloff    484
I've been meaning to pick up Code Complete for a while, based on the many good reviews it gets in various places. The only thing that stopped me was the fact that apparently, it was becoming kind of outdated, for instance hardly mentioning the mysterious new object oriented programming paradigm, and much advice largely being based on a C point of view. Apparently a second edition has been out since June. I'm wondering, for those of you who have it, how are things on the point of being outdated, is it still largely C based or does it discuss topics for newer languages as well, and is it still that great?

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daerid    354
Code complete is largely based on C, and doesn't really mention OOP, but that really doesn't matter. The concepts and design of programming languages aren't what it covers. It's a little more basic. How to structure and comment the text that makes up your code. Testing and debugging. And a whole lot of other stuff.

My recommendation: Get it. Read it. Use it. Love it.

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Boris Karloff    484
Are we talking about the same book? I just remembered to check Amazon.com's Look Inside feature, and I notice there's an entire chapter on classes, ADT's, class interfaces and class implementation... So apparently McConnel did feature OO in this version.

I'm looking at the 2004 edition, mind. Still sounds like a good buy, though. And not all that expensive, for this sort of book.

EDIT: I realise, though, that many of the fundamentals of programming are virtually timeless, and as such more than 90% of what was valid in the early 90's is valid today, but general knowledge of programming matters has probably grown as well, and so have the various sources where one can get needed information. I guess what I'm wondering is if this new edition is still as essential and impressive as the first edition was in '93.

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Daerid is talking about the first edition of Code Complete. The second edition has the code samples in C++, Java, and some more languages I think (probably VB.NET and C# or something).

I have a physical copy of it sitting directly to me right. I haven't gotten very far into it yet, but according to the author's website, various reviews, and the table of contents, the book does cover OOP. At a glance though, I only see chapter 6 which is called "Working Classes". As for being outdated, the author feels that the first edition of Code Complete is still 95% relevant to today. So, there does seem to be a section on classes, but the scope of the book is more general with chapters dedicated to conditionals, variable naming, fundamental data types, looping and etc. If you're looking specifically for OOP, Design Patterns is probably a better choice. I think the point of this book is to put into place good general code practices.

See the author's website for more info.

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Boris Karloff    484
Quote:
Original post by load_bitmap_file
there does seem to be a section on classes, but the scope of the book is more general with chapters dedicated to conditionals, variable naming, fundamental data types, looping and etc. If you're looking specifically for OOP, Design Patterns is probably a better choice. I think the point of this book is to put into place good general code practices.

See the author's website for more info.


Hmm, thanks. I'm not looking specifically for OOP, but I'm under the impression that a book about good general code practices could use some mention about good OOP code practices. I mean, OOP is general enough, nowadays. Besides, if the book goes into fundamental datatypes, one could argue that that's already beyond the scope of 'general'.

Anyway, I'll check out that website. Thanks again.

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