Jump to content
  • Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  
Garmichael

Keeping scale in 3D Studio Max.

This topic is 5133 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Im currently learning 3D Studio max at school. We're about half way through, and im learning alot and enjoying it alot. So I am trying to do alot of advanced stuff outside of class. Im modeling an Airship.. Pre-PSX Final Fantasy style. Ive got the hull modeled out. Also, it has a deck and some general shape. Now, I need to add in rails, windows, anchors, lamps, and a Door to the cabin. My problem is that I have no concept of how to keep it all in scale. Does anyone have any tips or techniques?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
One of the more common methods is to set 3DS-MAXs unit setup to Meters (Or feet if you prefer), because it becomes a lot easier to visualise how things would size up to an average person.

Another technique (The one I try to use most of the time in conjunction with the previous method) is to create a 'Dummy model' with the same proportions as your character, and move this around whenever you need to create an object and use it as a point of reference.

The Tape Measure helper is also incredibly useful, and works best when you set up your units correctly.

Also, slightly off topic, if you plan to walk around this ship in 3rd person, remember to account for the camera and the player. Interior sections should be roughly 2-3 times what they would be in real life, so leave big gaps between objects you may walk between, and make the rooms quite large with high ceilings. This can prove troublesome if you walk from an outside area to inside area, so creating a 'split' (Door leads into darkness, player goes in, screen fades to black, player is moved to door of inside area, fades back from black) is probably the best technique to use, as it allows you to have a Tardus-like effect very cheaply. Another thing to keep in mind is try to keep large objects like cabinets and shelves (Generally anything taller than the player) away from the center of the room, as this can make camera navigation difficult. If you need to fill in space, try to use non-imposing fillers such as rugs, lights, or waist-height benches.

Of course, this probably wont affect you at the current stage, but if you ever intend to show this off in future to a potential employer, they'll admire your forethought.

Hope this helps you, and good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow man, that was really usefull and helpfull. Some good stuff in there that I hadnt really thought about, but it makes alot of sense. Thanks.

Only one question: How do i change Max's units?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote:
Original post by Garmichael
Only one question: How do i change Max's units?


Should be under Customise->Units Setup. Set it to Metric, Meters.

Also, if you're going to be exporting this for use in an engine (But not all that important if it's just a learning excercise), go to System Unit Setup and set each MAX unit to be 10 centimeters.

That number may seem arbitrary, but it's a good middle ground when it comes to keeping a good precision. Although some engines have preferred settings for this, so you'll have to consult the documentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!