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Hedos

Installing Linux from Windows

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Hey, I have an old computer ( Pentium-S 100mhz, 16mb ram, 1.3gb hard drive ) and I decided that I would like to make a server from it and install linux on it. So far I think I am interested to try Slackware (even though it is said to be "harder") or SuSE.. What would you suggest me? I need something which will be fast and will take as less memory as possible, since I am quite limited. Also, sometimes I might want to use a graphical interface.. I heard Gnome and KDE are quite slow.. Are there any good alternatives which would be faster? Any other tips to optimize linux speed? Also I have a problem, the CMOS battery on the motherboard of this computer is dead, everytime I boot up, the BIOS settings are reset to default.. So I cannot change the options to boot with a floppy... I can plug the old hard drive on my windows computer and access it with no problems.. Is there a way I could install it directly from my computer? Otherwise is there any other alternative? Thanks a lot

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Quote:
Original post by Hedos
Hey, I have an old computer ( Pentium-S 100mhz, 16mb ram, 1.3gb hard drive ) and I decided that I would like to make a server from it and install linux on it.
So far I think I am interested to try Slackware (even though it is said to be "harder") or SuSE..

What would you suggest me?
I need something which will be fast and will take as less memory as possible, since I am quite limited.
Also, sometimes I might want to use a graphical interface.. I heard Gnome and KDE are quite slow.. Are there any good alternatives which would be faster?
Any other tips to optimize linux speed?


I would personally use Debian. It's good for servers and the like. For a graphical interface you might want to try a window manager such as fvwm, icewm (win95 clone) or blackbox. There are a lot of different WMs out there. You might also want to compile your own kernel and get rid of all the unnecessary modules etc.

Quote:

Also I have a problem, the CMOS battery on the motherboard of this computer is dead, everytime I boot up, the BIOS settings are reset to default.. So I cannot change the options to boot with a floppy...
I can plug the old hard drive on my windows computer and access it with no problems.. Is there a way I could install it directly from my computer?
Otherwise is there any other alternative?

Thanks a lot


Download a CD image for the distro of your choice. Put the hard drive in your other computer, boot from the CD and install the OS on the hard drive.

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You can completely setup the hard-drive using the other PC, then put it in the old pentium. You just have to careful to build the correct kernel modules to support the hardware for both the install PC and the target pentium. This is alot easier when you use one of the CD distro's which auto-detect your stuff.

Can't you turn the p-100 on, change the BIOS and just reset/reboot without turning it off?

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Thanks for the info, I'm gonna try that and tell you how it went.

Quote:
Original post from Magmai Kai Holmlor
Can't you turn the p-100 on, change the BIOS and just reset/reboot without turning it off?


Well, everytime my computer boots, I have a message of "CMOS Checksum Error. CMOS Battery Failed." and "Default setting reset".

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Hum, yeah, the time might be problematic..
I might try to replace it.. but, is it hard? Does it require any specific knowledge?
Can I easily find the good battery? (Are the batteries usually standard?)
And where could I get it?

edit: Ok, I've been searching a lot, but I can't find the name of my motherboard. I don't even know which company made it.
And I searched and didn't find the CMOS battery.. :/
I don't see any motherboard name when booting nor in the BIOS..
Would it be possible to find the motherboard name by using a software?

[Edited by - Hedos on November 8, 2004 8:54:03 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Some old mainboards (and his MB seems to be quite old) used rechargeable NiCd batteries instead of the standard lithium button cells (because the CMOS RAM + clock took much more current than the current ones). Those used to die after a couple of years of non-usage. Lithium cells, otoh, can last for decades. If you replace a rechargeable cell with a standard lithium one, it might leak/catch fire/explode. Be careful.

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Well, this computer definitly doesn't have a "standard lithium button" battery..
Is it possible to change a NiCd?
How would I recognise where it is in the first place? I have no idea what does it look like?

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Well, this computer definitly doesn't have a "standard lithium button" battery..
Is it possible to change a NiCd?
How would I recognize where it is in the first place? I have no idea what does it look like?

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I decided to install slackware..
After a lot of problems, it finally worked, yay I'm happy!

But now, another problem :/
I just tried to use the X Window GUI, by typing 'startx'..
It apparently crashed, there was only a blank screen, so I manually reseted my computer..
At the booting, I had a message saying that the hard drive hadn't been correctly unmounted, so it had to be scanned.
Once that was done, my computer rebooted again.
But now, the loading was different than before.. there were a few warning.. and my computer name had dissappeared and was replaced by "(none)"..
So now, when I'm logged in, I see this prompt for the shell:
root@(none):

Any idea what might have happened?
Will it have other consequences?
How can I fix it?

Thanks..

edit: Well, I found the "hostname" command.. But when I reboot, my hostname gets reset to "(none)"..
And here are some of the warnings I now have:
agpgart: Maximum main memory to use for agp memory: 2M
/lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o.gz: init_module: No such device
/lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o.gz: Hint: insmod errors can be caused by incorrect module parameters, including invalid IO or IRQ parameters.
/lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o.gz: insmod /lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o.gz: init_module: No such device failed
/lib/modules/2.4.26/kernel/drivers/char/agp/agpgart.o.gz: agpgart failed scsi0: SCSI host adapter emulation for IDE ATAPI devices
Starting sysklogd daemons: /usr/sbin/syslogd /usr/sbin/klogd -c 3 -x
eth0: error fetching interface information: Device not found
eth1: error fetching interface information: Device not found
eth2: error fetching interface information: Device not found
eth3: error fetching interface information: Device not found
WARNING: NFS partitions found in /etc/fstab, but /etc/rc.d/rc.portmap is not executable. If you do not run portmap, NFS partitions will not mount properly. To start rpc.portmap at boot, change the permissions on /etc.rc.d/rc.portmal: chmod 755 /etc/rc.d/rc.portmap

/usr/sbin/apachectl start: httpd could not be started


And there's a few other NFS messages.. but I don't have any "NFS" partitions, all my partitions are ext2.

And there's now this apache error, even though everything was working perfectly before I tried this 'startx' and did a manual reset :(

edit2: Just realized that the 'man' don't work anymore.
If I type, for example, "man ls", I have this error:
Error reading man page /usr/man/man1/ls.1.gz
No manual entry for ls

There's the same error for any 'man' I try..

[Edited by - Hedos on November 13, 2004 5:12:17 AM]

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Quote:
but I don't have any "NFS" partitions, all my partitions are ext2.

That's the problem. EXT2 does not have a journal, so a crash can do pretty heavy damage to the filesystem. I would recommend a reinstall and the use of EXT3 or even better ReiserFS.

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