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programming languages in future

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what language do you think will take place c++? i mean will c++ always be the most popular? (i don't think so.) which programming language(s) do you think have a good future? can it be D? or E? :) and how will be the "programming" in future. will it be easier or harder? and other questions about this subject.... waiting for your comments..

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It's hard to tell now what language will replace current ones as a mainstream, professional development tool. My opinion is that as time passes, different areas of development will start using different languages. It's not unusual to see C# being used instead of C++ if development speed (as opposed to runtime speed) is what counts, or php if you're developing online applications. To each language its niche, you should never expect a language to be efficient for all purposes.

I believe as time passes:
- Coding will become easier because languages/libraries will implement commonly used routines that will ease the work of the coder. This is already the case with C#, where implementation is made extremely easy by the many language features.
- Design (as in, deciding what to code) will become harder, because as implementation time decreases and customer expectations raise, applications will become more complex, and therefore require more design put into them.
- Debugging will also become easier (it already has) because of 1° languages that do not allow bug-prone constructs (EVEN if experienced programmers do not create bugs using these features) and 2° better and better debug tools and protocols (we've seen unit testing, assertions, exceptions, call stacks, variable watching etc appear during our lifetime, who knows what we'll come up with next time?). However, as designs grow increasingly complex, the amount of design-related bugs will increase before general "bugless designing" methods appear.
- Optimization will become harder, if you want to do it by hand. Optimizing compilers and linkers are getting increasingly smarter over time, with professionals entirely dedicated to making them better. The only case where a programmer might want to optimize something by hand is a case where he knows better than the optimizer what is efficient and what is not. These cases will become increasingly complex and convoluted as optimizers grow smarter.

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C++ will not always be popular. What will replace it? Probably nothing. Compilers will begin producing language independant bytecode almost exclusively, so there will no longer be any need for any one language to be universally recognized. .Net is a move towards this. This will make programming considerably easier. Why spend hours writing a matrix library for your C++ program when you can just do the parts that require heavy matrix manipulations in Matlab? GUI editing programs will let you throw around widgets, then it'll spit out a list of functions you need to implement in whatever language you see fit. Portability requirements will be pushed onto the virtual machine/JIT compiler/whatever that your bytecode is ran through on the target system. Code reuse will be taken to a whole new level.

CM

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Quote:
Original post by Conner McCloud
Code reuse will be taken to a whole new level.



I'm curious if that will ever take much hold, as alot of people still rather write their own little libraries,

also I've been using java alot lately, and that involves heaps of structured code and libraries, which is nice, but sometimes it just gives you the shits and want to quit using java altogether, as sometimes I find i hate the way they coded the interfaces etc.

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Let me guess there aint be any programming languages , but powerful AI that get's your request and builds program without bugs, with help , and documentation in seconds. You just have to tell him what you really want' to get. So what would programmers do instead of programming ? Who knows :)

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Quote:
Original post by _the_phantom_
Quote:
Original post by DMINATOR
So what would programmers do instead of programming ? Who knows :)


easy, take credit for the AI's work and spend all day down the pub [grin]


Ofcourse the would patent it :) and get royalties for it's work, that's gonna be cool :)

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I think we will just see better tools for existing languages - obviously, C++, Java and C# seem to be moving towards each other these days.

So while on one hand, C++ can have GC etc, Java/C# getting Generics etc, they are becoming almost indistinguishable.

But the tools need to get better. What Eclipse does for Java (which is pretty damn smart), new tools will do for other langs (I think the new VS.NET may do some of it for C#) - automatic refactoring support, more intelligent code completion etc.

Mark

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Sounds like the 'language' they use to program Lego Mindstorms... :)

I reckon (short term, say 5 years) things will keep pootling along pretty much as they are already. RAD will be owned by C# or similar, general development will still be mostly in C++ (for the same reason we still use QWERTY keyboards) but shifting more towards interpreted / JITed languages as hardware speeds increase and speed concerns decrease, and people will keep rewriting the same old crap in their own special way rather than using common libraries. :)

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I think than the main enemy of C++ is not another programming language but the growing speed of the CPUS. C++ make programms that run fast, but it's considered as a difficult language. But many applications does not need to run so fast because the computers today are VERY VERY fast!!!

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Quote:
Original post by fractoid
Sounds like the 'language' they use to program Lego Mindstorms... :)

Its a variant of Labview, which is fairly popular among engineers. So there's your useless trivia for today.

I do envision visual programming becoming more popular [especially amongst non-programmers], but I suspect at the lower levels it will still be done by more traditional methods. You'll draw a bunch of blocks and show how they interconnect, and then go in and write a couple lines of code to define the boxes. But perhaps this won't be neccessary. Right now Labview [and Simulink, the other visual environment I'm familiar with] aren't anywhere near ready, but they're also specialized tools. A more general solution may well work just fine.

CM

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I don't think there is a limit to what we can do with more cpu power. perhaps holographical displays will eat up more instructions and the emulation of other sensory awarnesses like touch taste and smells although I'm not sure a computer could generate a smell or a taste but more realistic virtual suits would be cool rather than a virbrating joypad or jacket. Imagine jumping out of a plane in a game and acually experiencing as you would if it was as real.

Until it feels real it is not a true game just an emulation and that should be the goal of computer development to make it real. Then to make little robots to do our work. Even business applications could become more creative. I think if you rely on the high level programs of today to make your programs you accept the limitations of the past that created them.

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