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Winograd

Is Python (and/or perl), standard content of the linux distros?

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Is Python (or perl), standard content of the linux distros? I mean: can I count on that when linux newb install his/her distro, it has python interpreter installed? And are libs providing some bindings to gtk or wxwidgets standard stuff also? I really don't know because I haven't used "official" distros in ages. I'm going to write simple gui interface for GNU configure, make, make install sequence :) . Intended audience is linux newbies obviously. At the same time I wan't to learn either perl or python (I prefer latter). And yes.. I know there are many package management systems (rpm, etc..) but you don't always find package you want, do you.. or has this changed since RedHat 4?

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I have not seen a full distro (aside from the run-on-a-floppy varieties) that do not contain python or perl. The only question is the version number.

To ensure the most compatible vs newest language versions, I would code to Python2.2 and Perl 5.6

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perl has been a standard for a long time.

python is a new standard.

Suse/novell, debian, ubuntu, redhat/fedora all include python in the default install (iirc)

[Edited by - C-Junkie on November 23, 2004 12:07:42 PM]

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Quote:
Original post by SiCrane
In fact, in some modern distros you couldn't take Perl out if you wanted to; too many of the controlling scripts are run in Perl.
If you're talking about modern, then that should be Python. Perl's been required for a bit longer than just modern distros, and is actually being phased out in some cases. (debian, i believe, perfers python to perl)

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