Sign in to follow this  
fguihen

poser charachter to 3DS max for animation and then to .x for directX

Recommended Posts

fguihen    100
ok, i asked a version of this already, but i am elabourating here a bit. i have a charachter created in poser. now im exporting it as a 3ds file and bringing it into 3DS max. i intend to lower the poly count using the mesh optimise tool, and then, im wondering if i can animate this in 3DS max, seeing as all the body parts are present and named,and then export it as an animated .x file for use in directX application? would i be better to scrap poser and just learn to create a charachter in 3DS max? the reason im using poser is i can have a charachter on screen in seconds, not like the ages it could take with 3DS max

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
You should use Poser for high-poly models, but low-poly modeling would be better to be done with 3dsmax.

You can use normal maps, which you can generate with NVIDIA Melody or ATI's NormalMapper. These programs need a high-poly and a low-poly versions of the model, from which it generates difference map as a normal map.

http://developer.nvidia.com/ -> Tools
http://www.ati.com/developer/ -> Tools

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fguihen    100
im sorry , but im not sure what you mean. is this it:

i have a poser charachter ( high poly). i pass this into NVIDIA Melody along with a low poly version of the charachter. this generates a charachter in between the two. is that right? one question..where do i get the low poly mesh from if all i have is the high poly one from poser?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
angrytofu    138
you sound like you are going through exactly what I did a few months ago..

too save you time forget poser.. and learn to model low model bodies in 3dsmax.. people told me that but I ignored them.. but after awhile I realized they were right

its not THAT hard top make a low poly human and the modeling skills you learn while doing it will come in handy

I thought about reduce the resolution of poser models also

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by fguihen
im sorry , but im not sure what you mean. is this it:

i have a poser charachter ( high poly). i pass this into NVIDIA Melody along with a low poly version of the charachter. this generates a charachter in between the two. is that right? one question..where do i get the low poly mesh from if all i have is the high poly one from poser?


no i think it renders the high poly model and then maps the results onto the low poly model. this will give you a low poly model that looks like it has more polys. this is how farcry etc do it these days I believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
It means that NVIDIA Melody operates on a high-poly model (made with poser) and a low-poly model (made with 3dsmax), making a normal map from the difference of the two models' vertex data.

In game you then render the low-poly model with the normal map as a bump map.

It may be possible that you can make a good low-poly model from the high-poly model with 3dsmax's Optimize-modifier, but I haven't tried this myself.
But in any case you can get much better results if you make the low-poly model from scratch with 3dsmax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster   
Guest Anonymous Poster
Yep,the above AP is right.

Its better to model the low poly version from scratch.

I have experience with reducing poser and very high poly characters(that were built mainly for film/animation stuff.. not games or game demo's)and it never really works that well.

There has always been problems with UV mapping,and with the reduced model(s) afterwards.



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Sign in to follow this