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deathsage

wat is a good game programing college

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DigiPen (http://www.digipen.edu)
They give you a strong foundation in Math, Physics, and Computer Science, so you're not just learning Game Design. Also, they don't have classes like "Learn the DirectX 9 API" because I heard that they let you make your own 3D Rasterizer unlike some other schools that you may hear of (i.e. UAT, FullSail)

Haven't really looked into what that new school in Florida thats being influenced by EA will offer though.

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Original post by wyrzy
DigiPen (http://www.digipen.edu)
They give you a strong foundation in Math, Physics, and Computer Science, so you're not just learning Game Design. Also, they don't have classes like "Learn the DirectX 9 API" because I heard that they let you make your own 3D Rasterizer unlike some other schools that you may hear of (i.e. UAT, FullSail)

Haven't really looked into what that new school in Florida thats being influenced by EA will offer though.


Yea, and we all know the industry is built around using custom 3d rasterizers *rolls eyes*

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I recently took a tour of EA games in Redwood City, California. We had a programmer talk to us about how things work there. I asked them if they used primarly directX or openGL and he said neither. For each platform they develop their own graphics library on top of whatever is the native one. As a side note I was considering interning there until the recently horror stories came out. Frankly, I rather work at Mc.Donalds and have my weekends and free time than be a slave to a coperate whore of a company.
:)
JDev

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Personally I would not advise going to college specifically for a game making degree or even a programming-related degree. Formal education cannot ever teach you the kinds of things that are required in practical, every-day development. The best way to learn, if you can at all possibly manage it, is to get your own experience and practice.

You mentioned that you're an auditory learner; everyone has slightly different learning styles, and auditory learners often find it more difficult to learn on their own. For you specifically I would recommend finding someone you can spend time with on projects, preferably someone who has some programming experience. Getting some projects under your belt, whether they succeed or not, will be more valuable than any degree - and a lot cheaper.

If you're going to do a degree, pick another subject you are interested in, like math, physics, etc. and study that. Especially in the game world it pays to have experience and knowledge outside of just programming, and employers will respect the fact that you took the time to get a degree and still have good programming skills.

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Quote:
Original post by JDev
I recently took a tour of EA games in Redwood City, California. ... I asked them if they used primarly directX or openGL and he said neither. For each platform they develop their own graphics library on top of whatever is the native one. ...


Probably a slight misundertanding -- on a PC, the "native" graphics library is DirectX or OpenGL. On Xbox the "native" library is DirectX. Sony and Nintendo have their own "native" graphics libaries -- not DirectX or OpenGL.

BTW, EA plans to use Renderware for all their games. Renderware runs on top of the "native" APIs as described above.

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Consider going to a 'real' college or university, and learn game programming on the side - by experimenting on your spare time, and trying to orient all of your school projects and assignments around game related things.

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I went to a "Game Design" program in New Brunswick, Canada. It is a community college, so its really cheap (Tuition: $2500 Canadian per year! And the living costs are low, there's lots of student places to rent for cheap). I think the great thing about being there is being around other like-minded people. It was a 2 year course.

The bad:

The program was underfunded, we had a teacher who was really excited about games and knew how to program, but unfortunately was very lazy, something that made him a bad teacher. And he was the ONLY one capable of teaching us Game Programming.

The good:

On the other hand, we learned how to use C++ very well. The game teacher wasn't totally useless, so that was a plus. He was good at getting people unstuck "one on one". And since most of our work was project based, he had plenty of opportunities to do that.

What I loved about this course is that I was able to go in there with NO knowledge of programming, and come out a really good C++ programmer. AND now I know what DirectX and OpenGL are, etc.. I understand the industry better, I have a portfolio started (a 2D/3D shooter game I worked on with a team for graduation). I would never have accomplished this much stuff in 2 years alone, with no direction. The program got me STARTED. Got the ball rolling. And it just keeps on rolling baby!

There's a new one in Montreal, Quebec called: "Centre Descartes". (Yes, they have English courses too) It seems like it might be better than the one I went to, but its more expensive ($18,500 for the whole course, no book costs, plus you get a "placement" with a game/IT company (supposedly)).

There's also the Guildhall in Dallas, Texas. That one looks cool. But I can't afford that.

Here's one bit of advice: No matter how complete the course seems from the brochure, its worth it to go over there yourself and ask students there what they think of the course. Brochures can LIE! The New Brunswick college had this on its brochure:

Direct3D
DirectSound
DirectInput


None of that was true. There was also a course called: "Game Intelligence" but did we learn anything from it? NO.

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If you have a foundation in math and programming I'd suggest going to FullSail. FullSail's a good school, but unfortunatly has a very high fail out rate ~60%. Lot of people come down to the school want to make games but just like playing them. The courses are very difficult and weed out people quickly.

Unlike what the other poster said, you are totally capable of writing a software rasterizer by the time you get out of fullsail.

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