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Lithic

Non-commercial Installer License

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I am currently creating various utilities for the game I'm developing. I have a few finished already and I'm packaging them in installers for distribution to my team. I want to add licenses to the installers to say that none besides those I specifically distribute it to can use it, but I am unsure where I can find such a license. I would like the final version of this game to be a sold to a publisher, so I do not want any legally unprotected pre-release anything floating around. Is there any templates for different kinds of licenses floating around the internet that I can use? I searched [google] for this and had trouble finding anything.

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I agree with Edward - make them sign an NDA instead (e.g. via Fax or snail mail). Don't rely on licenses! Also make sure to have a hidden UID compiled into the code that gets assigned to each person you send it to. This way you can easily track who's guilty in case of a leak.

An NDA/special contract is the only bullet-proof way to protect yourself from damage. The UID thing adds an additional layer of security (don't let them know there is such a thing, though).

Best wishes,
Pat.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
It tooks our lawyers 3 weeks to come up with a license that basically said "if it breaks, don't sue us", but in language that is IMPOSSIBLE to decode. But it wasn't engineerings decision, the VCs want their ass covered.

But anyways, I just wouldn't bother with it too much. Why are you so protective over your tools? Not to sound insulting (most everyone here is in this boat), but you are probably not going to sell your game to a publisher and even if you did... bah, im not going to bother.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Quote:
Original post by darookie
I agree with Edward - make them sign an NDA instead (e.g. via Fax or snail mail). Don't rely on licenses! Also make sure to have a hidden UID compiled into the code that gets assigned to each person you send it to. This way you can easily track who's guilty in case of a leak.

The join page of my website has an employer/consultant agreement and a NDA that I force anybody to sign before they can even look at the requirements for applying to join my team.

Embedding a UID should be fairly easy.

[quote]
But anyways, I just wouldn't bother with it too much. Why are you so protective over your tools? Not to sound insulting (most everyone here is in this boat), but you are probably not going to sell your game to a publisher and even if you did... bah, im not going to bother.
I've already worked on one successful project (the first raycasting engine for calculator in z80 ASM with another guy who posts in the forums here), and I've been experimenting in gamedev with 3D APIs since my start date. My newest engine looks very promising and I see nothing preventing it from becoming a commercial success. All that is really needed for a successful game project is experienced people, and I've got the programming aspect well-covered.

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Quote:
Original post by darookie
I agree with Edward - make them sign an NDA instead (e.g. via Fax or snail mail). Don't rely on licenses! Also make sure to have a hidden UID compiled into the code that gets assigned to each person you send it to. This way you can easily track who's guilty in case of a leak.

The join page of my website has an employer/consultant agreement and a NDA that I force anybody to sign before they can even look at the requirements for applying to join my team.

Embedding a UID should be fairly easy.

Quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
But anyways, I just wouldn't bother with it too much. Why are you so protective over your tools? Not to sound insulting (most everyone here is in this boat), but you are probably not going to sell your game to a publisher and even if you did... bah, im not going to bother.

I've already worked on one successful project (the first raycasting engine for calculator in z80 ASM with another guy who posts in the forums here), and I've been experimenting in gamedev with 3D APIs since my start date. My newest engine looks very promising and I see nothing preventing it from becoming a commercial success. All that is really needed for a successful game project is experienced people, and I've got the programming aspect well-covered.

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Quote:
Original post by Lithic
Quote:
Original post by darookie
I agree with Edward - make them sign an NDA instead (e.g. via Fax or snail mail). Don't rely on licenses! Also make sure to have a hidden UID compiled into the code that gets assigned to each person you send it to. This way you can easily track who's guilty in case of a leak.

The join page of my website has an employer/consultant agreement and a NDA that I force anybody to sign before they can even look at the requirements for applying to join my team.


OK, that I'd say is a little excessive... :P

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