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Best level editor for indoor game

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I'm working on a technical demo, my first game ever featuring indoor rendering. (I've made a couple of games using terrain before). I was wondering if anyone would be kind enough to share some advice on which level editor to use... Some details about the project: -Planning to use shaders, normal mapping, light mapping, etc. -High poly counts, targeting NV30+ / Radeon 9500+ -Very short development timeframe, so need something easy to import -Only need to make ONE level, so "ease of use" is not important -BSP compiler is probably not necessary -Lighting: static for walls, but will have option to create dynamic lights, e.g. attach a light to a particle system. So, I will need some utility to create lightmaps. I assume this would be a feature of the level editor itself, or are there some separate tools that could create the light maps? Would Radiant be the tool of choice for a project like this? It's oriented towards Quake 3 (older tech) so would it scale well to a project like this? Also would the fact that I'm not going to use BSPs be a problem? Any other level editors you guys would recommend looking into? Thanks! roos

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Since BSP is not a neccesity, why not consider just using a standard model format from a 3d modeling program. BSP is outdated tech as far as I can tell. Our studio simply uses exported .x file format objects. So 3D studio is our level editor of choice.

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Whoa, ppl responded already! :) Thank you guys very much...

@ AP: How do you generate lightmaps in your situation? Wow, if all I have to do is create a level in 3dsmax and export as .x that would be very easy :)

@ Vamypre: Thanks, will check out the link!

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I agree with the AP. If BSP compiling is not needed by your engine, use polysoup modelers (3DS MAX, Maya, etc) to make your levels, since they allow you a GREAT deal more of freedom than the brush-based map formats, like accurate UV manipulation and the ability to adjust normals at vertex-level.

MAX and Maya also allow you to use their own high-profile renderers to bake lightmaps, so you can get much superior diffuse lighting, with global illumination and radiosity effects.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I'm not the OP, but I have some questions.

1) If a 3D Modeler (3DS MAX, Maya, Milkshape, etc) is used to create the levels of an indoor game, would space-partitioning (Octree?) be needed? Or would this depend on the size/polycount of the levels?

2) Assuming the same situation above, would you need to calculate lightmaps using radiosity yourself? Isn't that really hard to do? Or can some 3D modelers calculate lightmaps for you, and save them as part of the model file format?

Thankyou,
Julien

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I have to say Deled has come on in leaps and bounds, Ive been sorta looking for a good level editor and came across it about a year and a half ago and it was crap!. But its really cool now, just used it, and there seems to be great support for it.

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Quote:

1) If a 3D Modeler (3DS MAX, Maya, Milkshape, etc) is used to create the levels of an indoor game, would space-partitioning (Octree?) be needed? Or would this depend on the size/polycount of the levels?

Well, you'll need to do some space-partitioning if you want to support at least frustum culling, not to mention some basic portalization. Depending on the polygon count, it isn't worth paritioning as far as the individual polygons, but have small clusters of polygons.

Quote:
2) Assuming the same situation above, would you need to calculate lightmaps using radiosity yourself? Isn't that really hard to do? Or can some 3D modelers calculate lightmaps for you, and save them as part of the model file format?


Most high-grade 3D modelers can bake their renderings into textures (with automatic UV unwrapping even). Maya and 3DS MAX can do that, not sure aobut others. They can generate a second UV channel per vertex and map the lightmap texture to it. So you need to export to a format that support multiple UV coords per vertex (writing your own exporter is always a good idea).

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